interatomic

Related to interatomic: intra-atomic

in·ter·a·tom·ic

 (ĭn′tər-ə-tŏm′ĭk)
adj.
Occurring, operating, or situated between atoms.

interatomic

(ˌɪntərəˈtɒmɪk)
adj
(General Physics) existing or occurring between or among atoms. Compare intra-atomic
References in periodicals archive ?
The influence of the interatomic force law and of kinks on the propagation of brittle cracks, Philosophical Magazine 31(3): 647-671.
For example, for a diamond we have the radius of the carbon atom [r.sub.a] = 0.077, and the distance between the reflection planes (interatomic) d = 0.356 nm.
Here, in contrast to slip, the atoms move only a fraction of an interatomic spacing relative to each other.
where U([r.sub.ij]) is the interatomic potential; [q.sub.i] and [q.sub.j] are the charges of ion i and ion j; [r.sub.ij] represents the distance between ion i and ion j; [A.sub.ij], [B.sub.ij] and [C.sub.ij] are parameters for BMH potentials.
where [m.sub.i] is mass of particle i(i = 1 ~ N), [F.sub.i] is interatomic force acting on that particle, [r.sub.i] is its position vector, and [phi] is interatomic potential energy of total system.
We determine the molecular interatomic energy between two molecules by employing continuous approximation and the Lennard-Jones potential.
Caption: Figure 2: Cs-corrected scanning electron microscope: (a) LiNb[O.sub.3] lattice with no RHT; (b) LiNb[O.sub.3] lattice after the RHT; (c) interatomic distance with no RHT; (d) interatomic distance with RHT.
Espinosa [32] formulated an equation of the form [E.sub.int] = 0.5 V(r), which is useful for estimating weak interatomic interaction energies, particularly HB energies.
At high concentrations of the polysaccharide solution, the molecules wrapped around each other, held together by molecular interatomic forces and van der Waals forces.
The interatomic interactions change inevitably causes the change of the structure and vice versa.