interbranch

interbranch

(ˌɪntəˈbrɑːntʃ)
adj
occurring between branches
See branch4a
References in periodicals archive ?
For more than a year the Senators have been working to establish the Interbranch Commission on the Child Welfare System (SB 297) to advance remedies.
In fact, for this reason the Constitution makes Congress supreme (interbranch coequality is a myth), as reflected in how that body can impeach presidents and judges but itself is untouchable--except by the people.
Rather than conceding the demise of the interbranch rivalry so
Green, who began her career as a public defender in 1977, is a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, president of the board of directors of the NH Public Defender, serves as a trustee on the board of the University System of New Hampshire and is a member of the Interbranch Criminal and Juvenile Justice Council.
In Menendez, the judge held that interbranch lobbying can qualify as an official act under McDonnell.
Nothing like a good bit of interbranch bickering to get the popcorn popping.
By creating interbranch networks of fellow partisans, they can facilitate the enactment of legislation.
The bank announced that interbranch withdrawals would be accommodated, but amid reports of many depositors being unable to withdraw their funds, the official said the bank opted not to process transactions where one branch did not have complete access to records from the client's 'home branch.'
Likewise, the traditional actors may follow doctrines of self-restraint to maintain interbranch harmony; for instance, the political question doctrine and case and controversy requirements prevent the judiciary from addressing certain issues (p.
To address these concerns, Kentucky formed the bipartisan, interbranch Task Force on the Unified Juvenile Code in August 2013.
First, the signing statements were criticized as subverting interbranch comity.