interchapter

interchapter

(ˌɪntəˈtʃæptə)
n
a short chapter in a book that occurs between two major chapters
References in periodicals archive ?
the juxtaposition of story and interchapter (the interplay, for example,
The argument develops over seven chapters and an interchapter. Each chapter situates Wordsworth's poetry as an inscriptional interaction in a contentious and developing print culture.
The interchapter, "The Cultivation of Decay and the Prerogatives of Modernism," includes a rich treatment of modernity against itself (the progress of modernity engendering doubts about what constitutes progress) in Thomas Hardy, H.
Macauley's Building Writing Center Assessments that Matter (2012) includes a chapter by Macauley titled "Getting from Values to Assessable Outcomes" along with an "interchapter" by Neal Lerner titled "Of Numbers and Stories: Quantitative and Qualitative Assessments in the Writing Center." The underlying message from both Macauley and Lerner is that we can and should quantify writing center effectiveness.
Attebery returns to Christian fantasy with moderate success in chapter 6 and the following interchapter. Chapter six is an angelology of fantasy.
Caption: Commercial real estate's future was on the menu at the Commercial Real Estate Women's Network (CREW) Tri-State Interchapter Dinner, hosted by NYCREW Network.
Growers constructed a fabricated, yet successful, narrative of labour shortages and emergencies to save American farm industries as way to have the importation program supported for more than two decades, q-he interchapter, "Morphology: Things on the Land" grounds Mitchell's approach in this historical geographical analysis.
Neal Lerner offers an "Interchapter" titled "Of Numbers and Stories: Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment Research in the Writing Center," which helps clarify the assessment possibilities of both qualitative and quantitative assessment approaches by considering the rhetorical context of differing assessment needs and readers.
"'Interchapter: Mailer on Miller." The Limits of Ferocity: Sexual Aggression and Modern Literary Rebellion.
In the interchapter on Henry Miller's reading, or more accurately, misreading of Lawrence in his book The World of Lawrence, Fuchs argues that Miller confuses Lawrence with himself and relies too heavily on Lawrence's "The Crown" on apocalyptic dissolution.
To account for performance during the Civil War and Interregnum before she turns to the women writers who benefited from "new opportunities for women" that were generated by the "rupture" and discontinuities in public theaters during that period (156), Tomlinson includes an "interchapter" on the siren appeal of song.