intercurrent

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Related to intercurrent disease: morbidity

in·ter·cur·rent

 (ĭn′tər-kûr′ənt, -kŭr′-)
adj.
Occurring at the same time as and usually altering the course of another disease.

[Latin intercurrēns, intercurrent-, present participle of intercurrere, to mingle with; see intercourse.]

intercurrent

(ˌɪntəˈkʌrənt)
adj
1. occurring during or in between; intervening
2. (Pathology) pathol (of a disease) occurring during the course of another disease
ˌinterˈcurrence n
ˌinterˈcurrently adv

in•ter•cur•rent

(ˌɪn tərˈkɜr ənt, -ˈkʌr-)

adj.
(of a disease) occurring while another disease is in progress.
[1605–15; < Latin intercurrent-, s. of intercurrēns, present participle of intercurrere to run between]
Translations

in·ter·cur·rent

a. intercurrente, que aparece en el curso de una enfermedad y que la modifica.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, caution is needed because of the potential risk of euglycemic ketoacidosis, whose incidence was slightly increased with SGLT-2 inhibitors mainly in type 1 diabetes, sometimes provoked by alcohol excess, surgery, or intercurrent disease (30, 33, 34).
The blood group of an individual will never change in life so have prime role in medico-legal investigations.8 Lattes have rightly said "the fact that belonging to a definite blood group is a fixed character of every human being and can be altered neither by lapse of time nor by intercurrent disease." Blood group like fingerprint is an unalterable primary character.8
The exclusion criteria included ST-segment elevation on electrocardiography (ECG) indicative of acute ST elevation myocardial infarction, pathologic Q waves, new or presumed new left bundle branch block or paced rhythm, previous history of coronary artery disease, prior coronary revascularization procedures either CABG or angioplasty or coronary stenting, renal insufficiency-serum creatinine >1.4 mg/dl (upper limit of normal), serious intercurrent disease and patients who refused to undergo coronary angiography during the hospitalization.
The presence of intercurrent disease introduces competing additional influences on MCV and MCH which may obscure an effect that might be observed when only healthy individuals are considered.