interdependence

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in·ter·de·pen·dent

 (ĭn′tər-dĭ-pĕn′dənt)
adj.
Mutually dependent: "Our physiology and that of the plants we eat are not only biochemically similar but interdependent" (Cindy Engel).

in′ter·de·pen′dence, in′ter·de·pen′den·cy n.

interdependence

(ˌɪntədɪˈpɛndəns)
n
dependence between two or more people, groups, or things: the interdependence of economies.
ˌinterdeˈpendency n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.interdependence - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
reciprocality, reciprocity - a relation of mutual dependence or action or influence
commensalism - the relation between two different kinds of organisms when one receives benefits from the other without damaging it
parasitism - the relation between two different kinds of organisms in which one receives benefits from the other by causing damage to it (usually not fatal damage)
mutualism, symbiosis - the relation between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other
sharing - having in common; "the sharing of electrons creates molecules"
sharing - using or enjoying something jointly with others

interdependence

noun
A logical or natural association between two or more things:
Informal: hookup.
Translations

interdependence

[ˌɪntədɪˈpendəns] Ninterdependencia f

interdependence

[ˌɪntərdɪˈpɛndəns] ninterdépendance f

interdependence

References in classic literature ?
It will act upon the basic fact that WHEREVER THERE IS INTERDEPENDENCE, THERE IS BOUND TO BE TELEPHONY; and it will therefore prepare maps of interdependence, showing the widely scattered groups of industry and finance, and the lines that weave them into a pattern of national cooperation.
Even in the case of acknowledged correlatives, and where names exist for each, there will be no interdependence if one of the two is denoted, not by that name which expresses the correlative notion, but by one of irrelevant significance.
The flimsy fabric of credit that had grown with no man foreseeing, and that had held those hundreds of millions in an economic interdependence that no man clearly understood, dissolved in panic.