interfamily

(redirected from interfamilial)

interfamily

(ˌɪntəˈfæmɪlɪ; ˌɪntəˈfæmlɪ) or

interfamilial

adj
occurring between, existing between, or involving two or more members of a family
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
P.224 Hepatitis C: interfamilial or sexual transmission?
Last produced at the Delacorte in 1968, Shakespeare's timeless tragedy of bitter, meaningless interfamilial hatred that destroys youth and love seems ideally suited to make this quintessential rite of summer in New York an even more evocative experience.
"This is the only political force that includes the subject of interfamilial and social violence as a matter of maximum importance, as well as everything relating to backing women's economic and social initiatives.
Viewed over the life cycle, there are no interfamilial
Epidemiological studies in smallpox: a study of interfamilial transmission in a series of 254 infected families.
Readers see the dual trajectory of the scene at once: on the one hand, the performance of same-sex desire exceeds Koana's ability to remain strictly within heterosexual limits; on the other hand, Cowrie's suggestion about the imposition of the blood-relations taboo on interfamilial love relationships recognizes a regulatory heterosexism.
Interfamilial and intrafamilial genomic diversity and molecular phylogeny of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II from Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Island.
(15.) For an account of Norman trade, interfamilial warfare, and war with France, see Eleanor Searle, Predatory Kinship, 68-93, 98-108, 159-93; John Le Patourel, "The Norman Succession 996-1135," English Historical Review 86 (1971): 225-50; Ferdinand Lot, Fideles ou Vassaux?
The armor is removed from the arena that fixes it in the system of gift exchange which solidifies heroic genealogies and, therefore, solidifies identities--and vice versa, for the superimposition of commodity exchange cannot help but remind us of what any ideology of gift exchange will lack, namely, an objective way of mediating interpersonal and interfamilial conflicts.
Nevertheless, in a curiously ironic twist, Galdos was less puritanical than Schwartz vis-a-vis the subject of interfamilial marriage.
But perhaps he is hiding behind this role, in order to not have to directly confront the actual substance of real theological or interfamilial conflicts.
Three primary factors in the family have been highlighted as being of importance in determining later behavior: family contextual factors, interfamilial or systemic factors, and family perceptual factors.
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