interferon

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in·ter·fer·on

 (ĭn′tər-fîr′ŏn′)
n.
1. Any of a group of glycoproteins that are produced by different cell types in response to various stimuli, such as exposure to a virus, bacterium, parasite, or other antigen, and that inhibit infection through mechanisms such as preventing viral replication or regulating the immune system.
2. Any of a group of synthetic glycoproteins that are structurally similar to these compounds and are used therapeutically, especially as antivirals.

interferon

(ˌɪntəˈfɪərɒn)
n
(Biochemistry) biochem any of a family of proteins made by cells in response to virus infection that prevent the growth of the virus. Some interferons can prevent cell growth and have been tested for use in cancer therapy
[C20: from interfere + -on]

in•ter•fer•on

(ˌɪn tərˈfɪər ɒn)

n.
any of various proteins, produced by virus-infected cells, that inhibit reproduction of the invading virus and induce resistance to further infection.
[1957; interfere + -on1]

in·ter·fer·on

(ĭn′tər-fîr′ŏn′)
Any of a group of proteins that are produced by animal cells in response to infection by a virus and that, in many cases, prevent replication of the virus. Some interferons trigger an immune response in the body. They have been investigated as treatment for many diseases, including certain cancers.

interferon

Immune system proteins that help to protect cells against attack by some kinds of viruses.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.interferon - an antiviral protein produced by cells that have been invaded by a virus; inhibits replication of the virus
alpha-interferon - a form of interferon that is produced endogenously and commercially for its pharmacological effects (including regulation of the immune system and antiviral and antineoplastic effects)
antiviral, antiviral agent, antiviral drug - any drug that destroys viruses
beta-interferon - a form of interferon that is produced by fibroblasts and have antiviral effects; used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis
gamma-interferon - a form of interferon that is produced by T cells and macrophages; involved in the activation of phagocytes
Translations

interferon

[ˌɪntəˈfɪərɒn] Ninterferón m

interferon

n (Chem) → Interferon nt

in·ter·fer·on

n. interferón, proteína natural liberada por células expuestas a la acción del virus que se usa en el tratamiento de infecciones y neoplasmas.

interferon

n interferón m; alpha (beta, etc.) interferon interferón alfa (beta, etc.); pegylated — interferón pegilado
References in periodicals archive ?
Several immunologic agents--adalimumab, anakinra, etanercept, three classes of interferons, and thalidomide--are classified in the general category of immunomodulators.
"For the first time, we have a study which provides clear information about the dose effect of interferons. This is the only study in MS specifically designed to investigate whether higher doses of interferon are clinically more effective than lower doses.
Part of the problem with interferon injections, Levy says, is that mixtures of alpha, beta and gamma interferons are probably necessary for the substance to have any effect in a given disease or tumor state.
Interferons are cytokines that regulate the expression of genes determining cellular fate and anti-viral defense.
Objective: To determine end treatment and sustained virological response to conventional interferons and ribavirin.
How cells respond to interferons. Annu Rev Biochem.
That's because a number of promising new approaches and treatments are on the horizon, including longer treatment regimens, a ribavirin prodrug called virami dine, hepatitis C virus protease and polymerase inhibitors, antifibrotic agents, and new interferons.
The majority of alpha interferons that are marketed are single-subtype recombinant interferons.
The researchers referred to these elusive cells as "natural interferon producing cells" or "NIPCs." Interferons are proteins rapidly generated in virus-infected cells and they suppress infection by interfering with viral replication in neighboring cells.
The beta interferons specialize in slowing down the immune response action.
Differences in activity between alpha and beta type I interferons explored by mutational analysis.