interfertile


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Related to interfertile: interbreed, hybridizes

in·ter·fer·tile

 (ĭn′tər-fûr′tl)
adj.
Capable of interbreeding.

in′ter·fer·til′i·ty (-fûr-tĭl′ĭ-tē) n.

interfertile

(ˌɪntəˈfɜːtaɪl)
adj
(Botany) (of plants and animals) able to interbreed
ˌinterferˈtility n

in•ter•fer•tile

(ˌɪn tərˈfɜr tl)

adj.
able to interbreed.
[1915–20]
in`ter•fer•til′i•ty, n.
References in periodicals archive ?
For each of the ten groups we reviewed: their taxonomy and geography (with particular regard to establishing the extent to which related uncultivated taxa and populations are potentially interfertile with social drug plants); identification of wild taxa or populations that are in danger of gene loss or even population extinction; pollen and seed vectors (the vehicles which transport genes from cultivated to non- cultivated populations); documented evidence of hybridization and gene transfer; information on the inheritance of the drugs (which affects the ability of the determining genes to develop the drug in targeted populations); information pertinent to the harmfiilness of the drugs in herbivores; and considerations that endanger particular ecosystems.
Low et al., "Oil palm genome sequence reveals divergence of interfertile species in old and new worlds," Nature, vol.
Loasoideae): Are interfertile species and inbred populations results of a recent radiation?
The mating group C was genetically interfertile strains from rice (Hseieh et al., 1977; Kuhlman, 1982).
Many different forms of New World Junonia tested in lab crosses are interfertile and produce viable fertile hybrids [39-41], but many of these interfertile forms are separated geographically or by habitat preference (see below) and would have limited contact in the wild.
These two taxa are also interfertile and hybrids have been observed in nature (R.K.
However, if you trace them around the North Pole, at about the same latitude, you find that there is a series of interfertile sub-species that link the two, each similar in appearance to those either side of it.
Hybridity was central to both monogenist and polygenist theories as a criterion defining the boundaries between species of animals and possibly also between races of people: members of the same species were interfertile while those of different species usually were not.
The two diploid subspecies are fully interfertile and an impressive set of genomics tools, including linkage maps, QTL data sets, ESTs, BAC libraries, and arrays is available for analysis of the H genome, which is homeologous with the A, B, and D genomes of hexaploid wheat (Hayes et al., 2003).
Lee Silver resolves the problem by suggesting that there would be intervention in the molecules bonding sperm and ova in such a way that all children who had benefited from such genetic enhancement would not be interfertile with those who had not benefited from it.