intergenerational mobility


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intergenerational mobility

(ˌɪntəˌdʒɛnəˈreɪʃənəl)
n
(Sociology) sociol movement within or between social classes and occupations, the change occurring from one generation to the next. Compare intragenerational mobility
References in periodicals archive ?
While there is some logic behind the push for increased state funding for colleges and universities to reduce rising tuition, the argument that increased funding is the magic bullet to help improve student success in broad access institutions is not borne out by the data on intergenerational mobility.
Low rates of intergenerational mobility in the advanced economies often correspond to high rates of income inequality.
'Better intergenerational mobility [or the process of moving up and down the socioeconomic ladder across generations] prospects in education may not necessarily be a predetermined outcome for economies that are moving into a higher income group.
Asher, World Bank; Paul Novosad, Dartmouth College; and Charlie Rafkin, MIT, "Getting Signal from Interval Data: Theory and Applications to Mortality and Intergenerational Mobility"
One concern about higher income inequality is that it is linked to intergenerational mobility. Intergenerational mobility refers to the change in socioeconomic outcomes from one generation to the next--from parents to their children as adults--and usually is measured by the intergenerational correlation in income, education, or social class.
The EITC has a proven record of success in encouraging work, reducing poverty, boosting educational attainment, increasing intergenerational mobility, and improving maternal and infant health.
2014), intergenerational mobility research in Britain is conducted almost exclusively at the national level.
That's what Raj Chetty and Nathaniel Hendren find in The Impacts of Neighborhoods on Intergenerational Mobility II: County-Level Estimates (NBER Working Paper No.
Transmission of economic status also appears to have been fairly persistent over time in the United States; empirical measures of intergenerational mobility across different generations have been relatively constant (Chetty et al.
Schatz's chapter focusses on intergenerational mobility. Schatz was a teacher in the newly opened Lawas District Government Secondary School in the 1960s, and his study compares socio-economic mobility across three generations--the original cohort of secondary school students, their children and their children's children.