interiority


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in·te·ri·or

 (ĭn-tîr′ē-ər)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or located on the inside; inner.
2. Of or relating to one's mental or spiritual being: "She thinks she has no soul, no interior life, but the truth is that she has no access to it" (David Denby).
3. Situated away from a coast or border; inland.
n.
1. The internal portion or area.
2. One's mental or spiritual life.
3. The inland part of a political or geographic entity.
4. The internal affairs of a country or nation.
5. A representation of the inside of a building or room, as in a photograph.

[Ultimately Latin, comparative adj. of inter, between; see en in Indo-European roots.]

in·te′ri·or′i·ty (-ôr′ĭ-tē, -ŏr′-) n.
in·te′ri·or·ly adv.

interiority

(ɪnˌtɪərɪˈɒrɪtɪ)
n
(Psychology) the quality of being focused on one's inner life and identity
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
A Picture Held Us Captive: On Aisthesis and Interiority in Ludwig Wittgenstein, Fyodor M.
Reality is plastic, particularly when it comes to other people, and Moon is fascinated by what people think and how their unknown, unfathomable interiority is expressed in the world.
It is a great pleasure for me to be part of this time of deep interiority and joy.
June 2-7: "The Challenge of Interiority", focused on creating a rich inner life of faith, prayer, community, and ministry to self; director: Fr.
In a tale of intertwining fates and the threads of interiority that connect the most disparate souls, Mexico City-based Guadalupe Nettel perfectly explicates the loneliness of expatriation as well as the gravity of a momentary meeting when one longs for love.
Pakistan has been taking measures to ensure its sovereignty and territorial interiority and will continue these measures in the future.
This book argues that the Black Arts Movement's call for Blackness has been misread because most have failed to see the movement's anticipation of the "new black" and "post-black." Hence, Black Post-Blackness compares the Black avant-garde of the 1960s and 1970s Black Arts Movement with its innovative spins of twenty-first century Black aesthetics focused on the 1970s second wave of the Black Arts Movement to show the connections between this final wave of the Black Arts movement and the early years of twenty-first century Black aesthetics to uncover a circle of Black post-Blackness that pivots on the power of anticipation, abstraction, mixed media, the global South, satire, public interiority, and the fantastic.
Anxieties of Interiority and Dissection in Early Modern Spain.
These agents or subjects share what Descola (2006) calls an 'interiority', which in other academic discourses is sometimes called soul/spirit.
Chapter 2 charts a spiritual interiority for both Protestants and Catholics.
That inner life, and human interiority in general, necessarily lie outside of History, according to both Levinas and Fondane.