interjection

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interjection

An interjection, also known as an exclamation, is a word, phrase, or sound used to convey an emotion such as surprise, excitement, happiness, or anger. Interjections are very common in spoken English, but they appear in written English as well. Capable of standing alone, they are grammatically unrelated to any other part of a sentence.
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in·ter·jec·tion

 (ĭn′tər-jĕk′shən)
n.
1. A sudden, short utterance; an ejaculation.
2. Abbr. interj. or int.
a. The part of speech that usually expresses emotion and is capable of standing alone.
b. Any of the words belonging to this part of speech, such as Ugh! or Wow!

in′ter·jec′tion·al adj.
in′ter·jec′tion·al·ly adv.

interjection

(ˌɪntəˈdʒɛkʃən)
n
1. (Grammar) a word or remark expressing emotion; exclamation
2. the act of interjecting
3. (Grammar) a word or phrase that is characteristically used in syntactic isolation and that usually expresses sudden emotion; expletive. Abbreviation: interj.
ˌinterˈjectional, ˌinterˈjectionary, ˌinterˈjectory, ˌinterˈjectural adj
ˌinterˈjectionally adv

in•ter•jec•tion

(ˌɪn tərˈdʒɛk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of interjecting.
2. something interjected, as a remark.
3. the utterance of a word or phrase expressive of emotion.
4.
a. a member of a class of words typically used in grammatical isolation to express emotion, as Hey! Oh! Ouch! Ugh!
b. any other word or expression so used, as Good grief! Indeed! Abbr.: interj.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin]
in`ter•jec′tion•al, in`ter•jec′to•ry (-tə ri) adj.
in`ter•jec′tion•al•ly, adv.

interjection

A part of speech or expression that can make sense when uttered alone, for example, “Hello.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.interjection - an abrupt emphatic exclamation expressing emotion
exclaiming, exclamation - an abrupt excited utterance; "she gave an exclamation of delight"; "there was much exclaiming over it"
2.interjection - the action of interjecting or interposing an action or remark that interrupts
disruption, interruption, gap, break - an act of delaying or interrupting the continuity; "it was presented without commercial breaks"; "there was a gap in his account"

interjection

noun exclamation, cry, ejaculation, interpolation, interposition the insensitive interjections of the disc jockey
Translations
تَعَجُّبمُلاحَظَه إعْتِراضِيَّه أو تَعَجُّبيَّه
citoslovcezvolání
udråbsordindskududbrududråb
huudahdushuudahdussana
indulatszóközbevetés
upphrópuninnskot, athugasemd
感嘆詞間投詞
interiectio
jaustukas
izsauksmes vārdsstarpsauciens
citoslovcezvolanie
vzklik
söz arasında söylemeünlem

interjection

[ˌɪntəˈdʒekʃən] N (= exclamation) → exclamación f (Ling) → interjección f; (= insertion) → interposición f

interjection

[ˌɪntərˈdʒɛkʃən] ninterjection f
the moronic interjections of the disc jockey → les interjections de demeuré du disc-jockey

interjection

n (= exclamation)Ausruf m; (Ling also) → Interjektion f; (= remark)Einwurf m

interjection

[ˌɪntəˈdʒɛkʃn] ninteriezione f

interjection

(intəˈdʒekʃən) noun
1. a word or words, or some noise, used to express surprise, dismay, pain or other feelings and emotions. Oh dear! I think I've lost my key; Ouch! That hurts!
2. the act of interjecting something.
ˌinterˈject verb
to say (something) which interrupts what one, or someone else, is saying.
References in classic literature ?
After casting her eyes around, as if to look for the aid which was nowhere to be found, and after a few broken interjections, she raised her hands to heaven, and burst into a passion of uncontrolled vexation and sorrow.
Our imagination was kept at its height, interjections followed quickly on each other.
Dairyman Crick's stories often seemed to be ended when they were not really so, and strangers were betrayed into premature interjections of finality; though old friends knew better.
Kennedy had, at length, become as talkative as Joe, and the two kept up a continual interchange of admiring interjections and exclamations.
But neither here nor elsewhere do I pretend to give his exact words; his vocabulary was small, and he had no gift for framing sentences, so that one had to piece his meaning together out of interjections, the expression of his face, gestures and hackneyed phrases.
Having delivered these ironical passages with a most wonderful volubility, and with a shrillness perfectly deafening (especially when she jerked out the interjections), Miss Miggs, from mere habit, and not because weeping was at all appropriate to the occasion, which was one of triumph, concluded by bursting into a flood of tears, and calling in an impassioned manner on the name of Simmuns.
It was, however, succeeded by another and another strain, each in a higher key, until they grew on the ear, first in long drawn and often repeated interjections, and finally in words.
Giry's three teeth were clashing in a noisy contest, full of hideous interjections. But all that could be dearly distinguished was this LEIT-MOTIF:
Our bashful fears, our silent interjections, our blushes, as we met each other's eyes, were expressive with an eloquence, a boyish charm, which I have ceased to feel.
Irwine answered, in the deep half-masculine tone which belongs to the vigorous old woman, and there entered a young gentleman in a riding-dress, with his right arm in a sling; whereupon followed that pleasant confusion of laughing interjections, and hand-shakings, and "How are you's?" mingled with joyous short barks and wagging of tails on the part of the canine members of the family, which tells that the visitor is on the best terms with the visited.
Then silent, scarcely uttering an interjection of admiration, they gazed, they contemplated.
At such intervals, after a few moments of abstraction, Ralph would mutter some peevish interjection, and apply himself with renewed steadiness of purpose to the ledger before him, but again and again the same train of thought came back despite all his efforts to prevent it, confusing him in his calculations, and utterly distracting his attention from the figures over which he bent.