interleukin

(redirected from interleukin-1-beta)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

in·ter·leu·kin

 (ĭn′tər-lo͞o′kĭn)
n.
Any of various small proteins that are produced by a variety of cell types, especially T cells and other white blood cells, and that regulate many aspects of inflammation and the immune response, including stimulating the production of white blood cells and platelets.

interleukin

(ˌɪntəˈluːkɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) a substance extracted from white blood cells that stimulates their activity against infection and may be used to combat some forms of cancer

in•ter•leu•kin

(ˈɪn tərˌlu kɪn)
n.
any of a family of small proteins that participate in the body's defense system, esp. by promoting the growth and activation of white blood cells.
[1979; inter- + leuk (ocyte) + -in1; so called because such proteins act as agents of communication between different populations of leukocytes]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.interleukin - any of several lymphokines that promote macrophages and killer T cells and B cells and other components of the immune system
lymphokine - a cytokine secreted by helper T cells in response to stimulation by antigens and that acts on other cells of the immune system (as by activating macrophages)
References in periodicals archive ?
Pakavathkumar et al., "Neuronal NLRP1 inflammasome activation of caspase-1 coordinately regulates inflammatory interleukin-1-beta production and axonal degeneration-associated caspase-6 activation," Cell Death & Differentiation, vol.
Detailed analysis of uric acid's role in initiating inflammation reveals a complex and powerful interaction between uric acid crystals, immune cells, multiple chemical signals, and eventual production of a powerful inflammatory protein, interleukin-1-beta. (11)
Exercise also led to reduced expression of inflammation-promoting cytokines in sciatic nerve tissue - specifically, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1-beta. That was consistent with previous studies suggesting that inflammation and pro-inflammatory cytokines play a role in the development of neuropathic pain in response to nerve injury.