interlineation


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in·ter·line 1

 (ĭn′tər-līn′)
tr.v. in·ter·lined, in·ter·lin·ing, in·ter·lines
To insert between printed or written lines.

in′ter·lin′e·a′tion (-lĭn′ē-ā′shən) n.

in·ter·line 2

 (ĭn′tər-līn′)
tr.v. in·ter·lined, in·ter·lin·ing, in·ter·lines
To fit (a garment) with an interlining.
References in periodicals archive ?
But in the end there can be no substitute for the literally painstaking project of examining the notes, page by page, slip by slip, correction by correction, interlineation by deletion, to derive the best portrait possible of how Madison's testament gained its final form.
Most of his work is accomplished by interlineation and marginal notes (for short omissions), alternatively by expunction and accompanying interlineation for rejected short readings.
No corrections to a Bid made by interlineation, alteration or
They may see for themselves some of the usual pitfalls of such documents: illegibility due to fading of the ink, ink showing through from the reverse of the membrane, and stains of various kinds; the parchment-saving devices of contraction and interlineation; and in compensation the exquisite neatness of some of the hands and the layouts achieved.
The manuscript itself may have contained 'alternatives': that is, besides the illegibility which may come from hasty writing or damage to the manuscript, there are possibilities such as revision, deletion, correction, overwriting, interlineation. Any of these, or combinations of these, may affect any passage.
This first chapter of Part II deals with erasure and overwriting, crossing out, subpuncting, interlineation, and marginal insertions.
Nothing in the will connects Will Shakspere to the theater except an interlineation, a late addition in another hand that leaves small sums for commemorative rings to three men, his "fellows" in their acting company.
This subtle interlineation is a much more demanding sort of reproduction than that involved in simply quoting one's own first edition, and Douglass engages in it partly, it would seem, out of a superabundant sense of power that he drew from his own literacy.
When Madison introduced the amendments in Congress, he proposed interlineation with the Constitution.(187) Madison's proposed "Second Amendment," along with his press, speech, and religion guarantees, was to be placed in the grab bag of Article I, Section 9, after the prohibition against bills of attainder and ex post facto laws and before the limitation on direct taxation.(188) As he initially drafted it, the clause read: "The right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed; a well armed, and well regulated militia being the best security of a free country: but no person religiously scrupulous of bearing arms, shall be compelled to render military service in person."(189)
The interlineation of "[ca]tapult has given place to cannon" (l.
Pepys had a horror of interlineation and insisted on an immaculate neatness in all things, and though one sequence was intended it was never done.