interlocking directorates


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interlocking directorates

pl n
(Commerce) boards of directors of different companies having sufficient members in common to ensure that the companies involved are under the same control
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Emerging research from Carroll (2017) provides a wide-angle view on the organization and architecture of the carbon sector in Canada, mapping its internal structure as a network of interlocking directorates and its ties to the financial sector and other segments of corporate capital--national and transnational.
Although never formally defined, weak governance is characterized by diffusion of shareholdings among outside owners, board passivity, minimal interlocking directorates, and managerial/board characteristics such as minimal equity ownership or an insider heavy board (Bethel & Liebeskind, 1993; Dalton & Dalton, 2011; Westphal & Fredrickson, 2001).
How is the carbon-capital elite internally structured as a network of interlocking directorates, which operates simultaneously at two levels: that of the corporation and that of the individual (Carroll 1984)?
There have been derivative suits alleging illegal interlocking directorates. In these suits, members of the board of a company are accused of breaching their fiduciary duties by allowing the overlapping directorate in violation of antitrust law.
Interlocking Directorates and Section 8 of the Clayton Act
One of the most contentious and yet recurrent ways senior leaders exercise power in society is through overlapping board memberships, what scholars call "interlocking directorates" or simply "interlocks." The tendency of boards of for-profit firms, policy groups, nonprofit organizations, and even universities is to share members.
Schoorman, 1983, "A Limited Rationality Model of Interlocking Directorates," Academy of Management and Review 8, 206-217.
Specific family business topics explored include: (1) governance and long-term orientation, (2) interlocking directorates, (3) social responsibility, (4) corporate entrepreneurship, (5) perceptions of justice, and (6) altruism and agency.