interlude

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in·ter·lude

 (ĭn′tər-lo͞od′)
n.
1. An intervening episode, feature, or period of time: "Kerensky has a place in history, of a brief interlude between despotisms" (William Safire).
2.
a. A short farcical entertainment performed between the acts of a medieval mystery or morality play.
b. A 16th-century genre of comedy derived from this.
c. An entertainment between the acts of a play.
3. Music A short piece inserted between the parts of a longer composition.

[Middle English enterlude, a dramatic entertainment, from Old French entrelude, from Medieval Latin interlūdium : Latin inter-, inter- + Latin lūdus, play; see leid- in Indo-European roots.]

interlude

(ˈɪntəˌluːd)
n
1. a period of time or different activity between longer periods, processes, or events; episode or interval
2. (Theatre) theatre a short dramatic piece played separately or as part of a longer entertainment, common in 16th-century England
3. (Theatre) a brief piece of music, dance, etc, given between the sections of another performance
[C14: from Medieval Latin interlūdium, from Latin inter- + lūdus play]

in•ter•lude

(ˈɪn tərˌlud)

n.
1. an intervening episode, period, or space.
2.
a. an early English comedic sketch performed between the parts of a play or other entertainment.
b. a play, esp. a comedy or farce, derived from this.
c. a morality play of the 14th to 16th centuries, typically containing farcical or comic elements.
3. any intermediate performance or entertainment, as between the acts of a play.
4. an instrumental passage or a piece of music rendered between the parts of a song, church service, drama, etc.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Medieval Latin = Latin inter- inter- + lūd(ere) to play + -ium -ium1]
in`ter•lu′di•al, adj.

interlude

A medieval morality play.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.interlude - an intervening period or episode
interval, time interval - a definite length of time marked off by two instants
entr'acte - the interlude between two acts of a play
2.interlude - a brief show (music or dance etc) inserted between the sections of a longer performance
show - the act of publicly exhibiting or entertaining; "a remarkable show of skill"
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
Verb1.interlude - perform an interlude; "The guitar player interluded with a beautiful improvisation"
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
perform - give a performance (of something); "Horowitz is performing at Carnegie Hall tonight"; "We performed a popular Gilbert and Sullivan opera"

interlude

noun interval, break, spell, stop, rest, halt, episode, pause, respite, stoppage, breathing space, hiatus, intermission, entr'acte It was a happy interlude in her life.
Translations
فاصِل موسيقي، إسْتِراحَه
interludi
přestávka
pause
välinäytösvälisoitto
felvonásköz
hlé
starpbrīdisstarpspēle

interlude

[ˈɪntəluːd] Nintervalo m, intermedio m; (in theatre) → intermedio m; (= musical interlude) → interludio m

interlude

[ˈɪntərluːd] n
(= short period) → intermède m
a happy interlude in his life → un intermède heureux dans sa vie
(in programme)intermède m musical interlude

interlude

nPeriode f; (Theat) (= interval)Pause f; (= performance)Zwischenspiel nt; (Mus) → Interludium nt; (= episode)Intermezzo nt, → Episode f; a peaceful interlude in his busy lifeeine friedliche Unterbrechung seines geschäftigen Lebens

interlude

[ˈɪntəluːd] nparentesi f inv, intervallo (Theatre) → intermezzo
musical interlude → interludio

interlude

(ˈintəluːd) noun
a usually short period or gap, eg between the acts of a play etc. We bought an ice-cream during the interlude; an interlude of calm during the violence.
References in classic literature ?
They are, therefore, sung as mere interludes, a practice first begun by Agathon.
They were followed by Interludes which were much the same as Moralities but were shorter, and as their name shows were meant to come in the middle of something else, for the word comes from two Latin words, "inter" between and "ludus" a play.
Gradually and imperceptibly the interlude melted into the soft opening minor chords of the Chopin Impromptu.
It seemed to Wingrave that the days which followed formed a sort of hiatus in his life--an interlude during which some other man in his place, and in his image, played the game of life to a long-forgotten tune.
When this interlude was over, Captain Mayhew began a dark story concerning Moby Dick; not, however, without frequent interruptions from Gabriel, whenever his name was mentioned, and the crazy sea that seemed leagued with him.
For men whose robes are dashed with blood, What joy to dream of gorgeous stairs, Stained with the torturing interlude That soothed a Sultan's midday prayers, In old days harsh and rude?
It came in as a sort of brief interlude and solo between more extensive performances.
He pulled himself together - it had been a very realistic little interlude.
A frequent interlude of these performances was the enactment of the part of Eutychus by some half-dozen of little girls, who, overpowered with sleep, would fall down, if not out of the third loft, yet off the fourth form, and be taken up half dead.
He would look on the affair as no more than an interlude in the main business of his life.
In the matter of love, as in all other affairs, he willingly assented to temporizing and adjusting terms; and a good supper, and an amiable tête-a-tête appeared to him, especially when he was hungry, an excellent interlude between the prologue and the catastrophe of a love adventure.
At this moment, however, the presence of Madame Servin produced an interlude in the drama thus played below the surface in these various young hearts, the sentiments, ideas, and progress of which were expressed by phrases that were almost allegorical, by mischievous glances, by gestures, by silence even, more intelligible than words.