parasite

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par·a·site

 (păr′ə-sīt′)
n.
1. Biology An organism that lives and feeds on or in an organism of a different species and causes harm to its host.
2.
a. One who habitually takes advantage of the generosity of others without making any useful return.
b. One who lives off and flatters the rich; a sycophant.
3. A professional dinner guest, especially in ancient Greece.

[Latin parasītus, a person who lives by amusing the rich, from Greek parasītos, person who eats at someone else's table, parasite : para-, beside; see para-1 + sītos, grain, food.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

parasite

(ˈpærəˌsaɪt)
n
1. (Biology) an animal or plant that lives in or on another (the host) from which it obtains nourishment. The host does not benefit from the association and is often harmed by it
2. a person who habitually lives at the expense of others; sponger
3. (formerly) a sycophant
[C16: via Latin from Greek parasitos one who lives at another's expense, from para-1 + sitos grain]
parasitic, ˌparaˈsitical adj
ˌparaˈsitically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

par•a•site

(ˈpær əˌsaɪt)

n.
1. an organism that lives on or within a plant or animal of another species, from which it obtains nutrients (opposed to host).
2. a person who receives support or advantage from another without giving any useful or proper return, as one who lives on the hospitality of others.
3. (esp. in ancient Greece) a person receiving free meals in return for amusing conversation or flattery.
[1530–40; < Latin parasītus < Greek parásītos one who eats at another's table =para- para-1 + sîtos grain, food]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

par·a·site

(păr′ə-sīt′)
An organism that lives in or on a different kind of organism (called the host) from which it gets some or all of its nourishment. Parasites are generally harmful to their hosts, and in some cases they may even destroy the other organism, although more often the damage they do is minor. Lice and tapeworms are parasites of humans.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

parasite


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An organism living on or in, and feeding on, another organism.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parasite - an animal or plant that lives in or on a host (another animal or plant)parasite - an animal or plant that lives in or on a host (another animal or plant); it obtains nourishment from the host without benefiting or killing the host
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
endoparasite, endozoan, entoparasite, entozoan, entozoon - any of various parasites that live in the internal organs of animals (especially intestinal worms)
ectoparasite, ectozoan, ectozoon, epizoan, epizoon - any external parasitic organism (as fleas)
parasitic plant - plant living on another plant and obtaining organic nutriment from it
host - an animal or plant that nourishes and supports a parasite; it does not benefit and is often harmed by the association
2.parasite - a follower who hangs around a host (without benefit to the host) in hope of gain or advantage
follower - a person who accepts the leadership of another
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

parasite

noun sponger (informal), sponge (informal), drone (Brit.), leech, hanger-on, scrounger (informal), bloodsucker (informal), cadger parasites living off the state
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

parasite

noun
One who depends on another for support without reciprocating:
Slang: freeloader.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
طُفَيْلِي
parazitcizopasník
parasit
nametnikparazit
parazitaélősködő
afætasníkillsníkjudýrsníkjudÿr
parazitasparazitinis
parazīts
parazitparazită
parazit
parasit

parasite

[ˈpærəsaɪt] N (lit, fig) → parásito/a m/f (on de)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

parasite

[ˈpærəsaɪt] n
(= animal, plant) → parasite m
(fig)parasite m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

parasite

n (lit)Parasit m, → Schmarotzer m; (fig)Schmarotzer(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

parasite

[ˈpærəˌsaɪt] nparassita m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

parasite

(ˈpӕrəsait) noun
an animal or plant that lives on another animal or plant without giving anything in return. Fleas are parasites; He is a parasite on society.
ˌparaˈsitic adjective
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

par·a·site

n. parásito, organismo que vive a expensas de otro.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

parasite

n parásito
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Internal parasite treatment (deworming) should be given every three months to adult animals.
Thus, the objective of this study was three-fold: to determine the prevalence and intensity of internal parasite of Bamboutos, to describe the disease control practices in the area, and to evaluate the effect of worm control practices on pig parasitism in the area.
Then there is Nosema apis, an internal parasite. It is ingested by adult bees as a spore, makes itself at home, and grows to produce more spores while continuing to spread.
The result of the questionnaire survey in this study focused on probing internal parasite control and management practices of horse owners and the parasite resistance problem.
From a practical angle, prior to the advent of modern external and internal parasite control, dogs brought these pests and health hazards into the home.
[8.] Ndlovu T, Chimonyo M, Muchenje V Monthly changes in body condition scores and internal parasite prevalence in Nguni, Bonsmara and Angus steers raised on sweetveld.
Liver hydatidosis is characterized by progressive growth of the hydatid cyst, which in its mature form is a fluid filled cavity, delineated by an external host derived layer called PERICYST and two internal parasite derived layers called ENDOCYST.
Eazypeta for internal parasite 12 days before and was on light plane of nutrition and mainly fed with curd-rice alternatively with branded dog food.
was the predominant internal parasite but its proliferation was prevented by installing 20 pm filters in the water inlet to retain the larvae and intermediate hosts.
The presence of severe lymphoid depletion associated with fungal pneumonia and severe external and internal parasite infections suggest the presence of an immunosuppressive syndrome in these birds that caused the death of several black-faced ibis juveniles in southern Chile during the summer of 2011.
The table shows that occurrence of internal parasite eggs were many just because the experimental animals did not undergo deworming.
Kirsty Peck, wildlife adviser with the RSPB, said: "Greenfinches and other finches in the UK have been struck by an internal parasite that has passed from pigeons in the last two years.