internationalist

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in·ter·na·tion·al·ism

 (ĭn′tər-năsh′ə-nə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The condition or quality of being international in character, principles, concern, or attitude.
2. A policy or practice of cooperation among nations, especially in politics and economic matters.

in′ter·na′tion·al·ist n.

internationalist

(ˌɪntəˈnæʃənəlɪst)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an advocate of internationalism
2. (Law) a person versed in international law
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (capital) a member of an International

in•ter•na•tion•al•ist

(ˌɪn tərˈnæʃ ə nl ɪst)

n.
1. an advocate of internationalism.
2. an expert in international law and relations.
3. (cap.) a member or adherent of a communist or socialist International.
[1860]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.internationalist - an advocate of internationalism
advocate, advocator, exponent, proponent - a person who pleads for a cause or propounds an idea
2.internationalist - a member of a socialist or communist international
International - any of several international socialist organizations
socialist - a political advocate of socialism
Adj.1.internationalist - influenced by or advocating internationalism
international - concerning or belonging to all or at least two or more nations; "international affairs"; "an international agreement"; "international waters"
Translations

internationalist

[ˌɪntəˈnæʃnəlɪst]
B. Ninternacionalista mf

internationalist

[ˌɪntərˈnæʃənəlɪSt]
adj [belief, opinion] → internationaliste

internationalist

nInternationalist(in) m(f)
References in periodicals archive ?
Pan American Women: US Internationalists and Revolutionary Mexico
Liberal internationalists, in contrast, support the spread of freedom through diplomacy and international institutions while reducing the use of military force to a "last resort.
PHD, a global media and communications network, received seven awards at the Internationalists Awards for Innovation in Media held in New York.
In particular, individuals who identified themselves as pacifists and liberal internationalists saw that a balance of power system as conducted by the Europeans could lead to militarism, arms races, and secret alliances.
The only modification the internationalists wished to make to this was to replace an imperial supranational authority by a transnational one.
He adopted a strategy that used force or the threat of force assertively, as realists recommended, but aimed at the demise of communism and the spread of democracy, as liberal internationalists advocated.
Berman's much more luminous essay describes how graduates of the 1968 left also moved toward the center, turning into liberal internationalists who came to accept that military power might be necessary in certain cases.
internationalists at a highly secret September 12-14 gathering of U.
What does make Coughlin's book important, however, is that it highlights the inability of (mostly conservative) commentators to differentiate between liberal internationalists like Blair and the neoconservatives who led the charge for war in America.
liberal conservative internationalists (Andrew Carnegie, Elihu Root, Teddy Roosevelt, and Woodrow Wilson) used an idea of justice to legitimize "accumulation by dispossession" and America's use of the World War I to renew the imperial project as war to "make the world safe for democracy.
After World War II, liberal internationalists played the leading role in creating the United Nations, the World Bank, and various security alliances designed to promote Western-style international stability, cooperation, and economic development.
As internationalists, many express the value of international contact; as Kendall puts it, "whatever we do in social work has to be more community, internationally and globally oriented" (p.