internecine


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Related to internecine: Internecine war

in·ter·nec·ine

(ĭn′tər-nĕs′ēn′, -ĭn, -nē′sīn′)
adj.
1. Of or relating to struggle within a nation, organization, or group.
2. Mutually destructive; ruinous or fatal to both sides.
3. Characterized by bloodshed or carnage.

[Latin internecīnus, destructive, variant of internecīvus, from internecāre, to slaughter : inter-, intensive pref.; see inter- + nex, nec-, death; see nek-1 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]
Word History: Internecine was first recorded in English in 1663, and at that time was used with the meaning "deadly" as part of the phrase internecine war. The Latin source of the word, spelled both internecīnus and internecīvus, meant "fought to the death, murderous." It is a derivative of the verb necāre, "to kill." However, in the 1700s, when Samuel Johnson was working on his great dictionary, he included internecine with the meaning "endeavoring mutual destruction." Some scholars believe that Johnson's definition was an error; that he misunderstood the prefix inter- as meaning "between" (which is its usual meaning) rather than as an intensifier meaning "all the way." Regardless of where Johnson's definition came from, his dictionary was so popular and considered so authoritative that his definition sparked a slight shift in the usage of internecine. From this point, more and more people began to use the word to imply a type of conflict in which opposing sides attempt mutual destruction rather than one that is simply highly destructive and deadly. This shift, which put the emphasis on a struggle between groups, paved the way for the eventual emergence of the sense that is most commonly used today, "relating to internal struggle within a nation, organization, or group." This modern usage can be seen in the sentence "While he was becoming more and more closely drawn into the internecine politics of the Socialist party and its pro-Bolshevik and anti-Bolshevik offshoots, she was getting a broader sense of the country, of what the Russian experiment meant to various people" (Mary V. Dearborn).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

internecine

(ˌɪntəˈniːsaɪn) or

internecive

adj
1. mutually destructive or ruinous; maiming both or all sides: internecine war.
2. of or relating to slaughter or carnage; bloody
3. of or involving conflict within a group or organization
[C17: from Latin internecīnus, from internecāre to destroy, from necāre to kill]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•ter•ne•cine

(ˌɪn tərˈni sin, -saɪn, -ˈnɛs in, -ˈnɛs aɪn)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to conflict or struggle within a group: an internecine feud.
2. mutually destructive.
3. characterized by great slaughter; deadly.
[1655–65; < Latin internecīnus, internecīvus murderous, derivative of internecāre to exterminate]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.internecine - (of conflict) within a group or organization; "an internecine feud among proxy holders"
internal - happening or arising or located within some limits or especially surface; "internal organs"; "internal mechanism of a toy"; "internal party maneuvering"
2.internecine - characterized by bloodshed and carnage for both sides; "internecine war"
bloody - having or covered with or accompanied by blood; "a bloody nose"; "your scarf is all bloody"; "the effects will be violent and probably bloody"; "a bloody fight"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

internecine

adjective destructive, bloody, deadly, fatal, mortal, exterminating, ruinous, exterminatory The episode has turned attention to the internecine strife here.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

internecine

[ˌɪntəˈniːsaɪn]
A. ADJ [strife, feud, warfare] → intestina
B. CPD internecine war Nguerra f de aniquilación mutua
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

internecine

[ˌɪntərˈniːsaɪn] adj [conflict, war, quarrel] → mutuellement destructeur/trice
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

internecine

adj
(= mutually destructive)für beide Seiten verlustreich; (= bloody)mörderisch; internecine wargegenseitiger Vernichtungskrieg
(= internal) quarrel, conflictintern; internecine strifeinnere Zerrissenheit
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

internecine

[ˌɪntəˈnisaɪn] adjdistruttivo/a per entrambe le parti
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Add to this that there are two young Englanders in the house, who hate all the Americans in a lump, making between them none of the distinctions and favourable comparisons which they insist upon, and you will, I think, hold me warranted in believing that, between precipitate decay and internecine enmities, the English-speaking family is destined to consume itself; and that with its decline the prospect of general pervasiveness, to which I alluded above, will brighten for the deep-lunged children of the Fatherland!
* A typical illustration of the internecine strife that permeated all society.
It was the only battle which I have ever witnessed, the only battle-field I ever trod while the battle was raging; internecine war; the red republicans on the one hand, and the black imperialists on the other.
This chapter concludes with an arresting phrase: "as a symbol of the bellum omnium contra omnes, [privateering provides] perhaps the most fitting image conceivable of the prolonged internecine European war of which it formed part" (228).
From there, Kaplan extends her argument to maintain that despite internecine struggles during the Second Republic, the Spanish Civil War, and the Franco dictatorship which followed, the citizens of Barcelona have successfully preserved a sense of solidarity and drawn from a common Catalan pool of cultural forms and symbols in their acts of resistance against oppression from the Spanish government.
The primary accomplishment would be fractionalization of the medical profession, encouragement of internecine warfare, and reduction of the profession's political clout.
But internecine fighting meant little agreement could be reached on what the future would look like.
Al-Zayani denounced the raids on the Presidential Palace in Aden and the suicide attacks on mosques in Sanaa and said that such heinous terrorist acts, which contravene all Islamic and human values, aim at plunging Yemen in internecine conflict and fighting.
It deplored the recurrent hostile statements which seek to fuel sectarian internecine conflict and sow divisions among Bahrainis.
An internecine feud within the Red Army is fought out in a German orphanage, with Nazi troops coming to the good guys' rescue, in the surprisingly restrained drama "4 Days in May." Set in the twilight days of WWII, this highly unlikely true story is another tastefully appointed effort from Teuton scribe-helmer Achim von Borries ("Love in Thoughts"), who again operates on the misguided assumption that aesthetically pleasing accouterments will magically provide a gateway into the characters' hearts and the pic's thorny thematic undercurrents.
Gregory is an irresistible story-teller and the tales of internecine squabbles, battles, intrigues, and cruelty never lack interest.
Mr Howard then faces the far greater challenge of re-building his party after two years of internecine warfare and inner party plotting.