internment


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internment

the act of undergoing training; confinement of enemy aliens, prisoners of war, and political prisoners: During World War II, many Japanese Americans were sent to internment camps.
Not to be confused with:
interment – the act or ritual of burial: The interment will be at noon at the Midtown Cemetery.

in·tern·ment

 (ĭn-tûrn′mənt)
n.
1. The act of interning or confining, especially in wartime.
2. The state of being interned; confinement.

internment

(ɪnˈtɜːnmənt)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy)
a. the act of interning or state of being interned, esp of enemy citizens in wartime or of terrorism suspects
b. (as modifier): an internment camp.

in•tern•ment

(ɪnˈtɜrn mənt)

n.
1. an act or instance of interning.
2. the state of being interned; confinement.
[1865–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.internment - confinement during wartime
captivity, immurement, incarceration, imprisonment - the state of being imprisoned; "he was held in captivity until he died"; "the imprisonment of captured soldiers"; "his ignominious incarceration in the local jail"; "he practiced the immurement of his enemies in the castle dungeon"
2.internment - the act of confining someone in a prison (or as if in a prison)
confinement - the act of restraining of a person's liberty by confining them
lockdown - the act of confining prisoners to their cells (usually to regain control during a riot)
false imprisonment - (law) confinement without legal authority
custody - holding by the police; "the suspect is in custody"
3.internment - placing private property in the custody of an officer of the law
seizure - the taking possession of something by legal process
drug bust, drugs bust - seizure of illegal drugs by the police
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Translations
إعْتِقال
internace
internering
internálás
kyrrsetning
internovanie
enterne etme/edilme

internment

[ɪnˈtɜːnmənt]
A. Ninternamiento m
B. CPD internment camp Ncampo m de internamiento

internment

[ɪnˈtɜːrnmənt] ninternement m

internment

nInternierung f; internment campInternierungslager nt

internment

[ɪnˈtɜːnmənt] ninternamento

intern1

(inˈtəːn) verb
during a war, to keep (someone who belongs to an enemy nation but who is living in one's own country) a prisoner.
inˈternment noun
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1939 the Enemy Foreigners Order provided for the arrest and internment, with certain specified exceptions, of all citizens of enemy nations, of the age of sixteen years and over, living in India.
Children's book publisher Simon & Schuster announced on Thursday that its imprint Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers plans to publish a new series for young adults, titled The Internment Chronicles, by New York Times bestselling author Lauren DeStefano.
The bench asked its office to club the petitions with the main plea moved by late Rohaifa Bibi for the release of her two sons currently held in the internment center in Landi Kotal.
They were reportedly de-radicalised for three months at different internment centres in the province, The Express Tribune reports.
President Barack Obama on Tuesday hailed the courage of Gordon Hirabayashi for defying the internment order for Japanese Americans during World War II as he posthumously awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the country's highest civilian award.
In Japanese Americans and Worm War II, Donald Hata and the late Nadine Hata provide a broad overview of the Japanese-American experience in the internment camps.
However, as this richly illustrated biography shows, he was a far more cosmopolitan character with roots deep in the Austro-Hungarian Empire--indeed, his origins brought about a period of internment between 1917 and 1918 despite his having become a British subject, all because he had helped his family and then an Hungarian who had escaped from his internment camp.
Most histories of the internment of Japanese-Americans begin with the attack on Pearl Harbor, which created such racial animosity against everything Japanese that even American citizens found themselves rounded up and incarcerated during the war's duration.
to join World War II -- and led to the internment of thousands of Japanese, German and Italian Americans.
PLACING MEMORY: A PHOTOGRAPHIC EXPLORATION OF JAPANESE AMERICAN INTERNMENT
During World War II, the Office of War Information (OWI) produced several propaganda films about Japanese Americans and the internment that the motion picture industry distributed.