interparochial

interparochial

(ˌɪntəpəˈrəʊkɪəl)
adj
interparish
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, to fulfill the needs of cities and rural areas, they should not limit their cooperation to the parochial or diocesan boundaries but strive to extend it to interparochial, interdiocesan, national, and international fields" (dpostolicam actuositatem, no.
It is relevant to this paper that at the time of the 1993-1994 survey "almost 60% of private schools and 33% of diocesan, regional, or interparochial schools reported having boards with limited jurisdiction" (Convey & Haney, 1997, p.
While the bishop retains some jurisdiction over all Catholic schools within his diocese, the jurisdiction of school officials (e.g., superintendents, presidents, and principals) and school entities (e.g., boards or councils) is dependent upon to whom the bishop has delegated certain authority within his diocese; upon whether the Catholic school is parochial, interparochial, diocesan, or private; and upon the governance model utilized within the particular school type.
It is important to appreciate that in Wales the parish became a significant unit of local administration, displacing lordship and township, only after the Act of Union of 1536.(78) As parochial autonomy grew, a competitive element was introduced into interparochial relations which was reflected in disputes over a whole range of matters -- particularly the maintenance of roads and bridges, but including, most importantly, controversies over the relief of paupers.