interpolate


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in·ter·po·late

 (ĭn-tûr′pə-lāt′)
v. in·ter·po·lat·ed, in·ter·po·lat·ing, in·ter·po·lates
v.tr.
1. To insert or introduce between other elements or parts.
2.
a. To insert (material) into a text.
b. To insert into a conversation. See Synonyms at introduce.
3. To change or falsify (a text) by introducing new or incorrect material.
4. Mathematics
a. To estimate a value of (a function or series) between two known values.
b. To create a continuous function that incorporates (a finite set of data), such as creating a curve that passes through a fixed set of points or a surface through a fixed set of curves.
5. To introduce estimated values of (pixel data) into a pixel array to improve the quality of an enlarged digital image.
v.intr.
To make insertions or additions.

[Latin interpolāre, interpolāt-, to touch up, refurbish, from interpolis, refurbished; see pel- in Indo-European roots.]

in·ter′po·la′tion n.
in·ter′po·la′tive adj.
in·ter′po·la′tor n.

interpolate

(ɪnˈtɜːpəˌleɪt)
vb
1. to insert or introduce (a comment, passage, etc) into (a conversation, text, etc)
2. to falsify or alter (a text, manuscript, etc) by the later addition of (material, esp spurious or valueless passages)
3. (intr) to make additions, interruptions, or insertions
4. (Mathematics) maths to estimate (a value of a function) between the values already known or determined. Compare extrapolate1
[C17: from Latin interpolāre to give a new appearance to, from inter- + polīre to polish]
inˈterpoˌlater, inˈterpoˌlator n
inˈterpolative adj

in•ter•po•late

(ɪnˈtɜr pəˌleɪt)

v. -lat•ed, -lat•ing. v.t.
1. to introduce (something additional or extraneous) between other things or parts; interject; interpose.
2. to insert, estimate, or find an intermediate term in (a mathematical sequence).
3.
a. to alter (a text) by the insertion of new matter, esp. deceptively or without authorization.
b. to insert (new or spurious matter) in this manner.
v.i.
4. to make an interpolation.
[1605–15; < Latin interpolātus, past participle of interpolāre to make new, refurbish, touch up]
in•ter′po•lat`or, n.
in•ter`po•la′tion, n.
in•ter′po•la`tive, adj.

interpolate


Past participle: interpolated
Gerund: interpolating

Imperative
interpolate
interpolate
Present
I interpolate
you interpolate
he/she/it interpolates
we interpolate
you interpolate
they interpolate
Preterite
I interpolated
you interpolated
he/she/it interpolated
we interpolated
you interpolated
they interpolated
Present Continuous
I am interpolating
you are interpolating
he/she/it is interpolating
we are interpolating
you are interpolating
they are interpolating
Present Perfect
I have interpolated
you have interpolated
he/she/it has interpolated
we have interpolated
you have interpolated
they have interpolated
Past Continuous
I was interpolating
you were interpolating
he/she/it was interpolating
we were interpolating
you were interpolating
they were interpolating
Past Perfect
I had interpolated
you had interpolated
he/she/it had interpolated
we had interpolated
you had interpolated
they had interpolated
Future
I will interpolate
you will interpolate
he/she/it will interpolate
we will interpolate
you will interpolate
they will interpolate
Future Perfect
I will have interpolated
you will have interpolated
he/she/it will have interpolated
we will have interpolated
you will have interpolated
they will have interpolated
Future Continuous
I will be interpolating
you will be interpolating
he/she/it will be interpolating
we will be interpolating
you will be interpolating
they will be interpolating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been interpolating
you have been interpolating
he/she/it has been interpolating
we have been interpolating
you have been interpolating
they have been interpolating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been interpolating
you will have been interpolating
he/she/it will have been interpolating
we will have been interpolating
you will have been interpolating
they will have been interpolating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been interpolating
you had been interpolating
he/she/it had been interpolating
we had been interpolating
you had been interpolating
they had been interpolating
Conditional
I would interpolate
you would interpolate
he/she/it would interpolate
we would interpolate
you would interpolate
they would interpolate
Past Conditional
I would have interpolated
you would have interpolated
he/she/it would have interpolated
we would have interpolated
you would have interpolated
they would have interpolated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.interpolate - estimate the value of
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
compute, calculate, cipher, cypher, figure, reckon, work out - make a mathematical calculation or computation
2.interpolate - insert words into texts, often falsifying it thereby
edit, redact - prepare for publication or presentation by correcting, revising, or adapting; "Edit a book on lexical semantics"; "she edited the letters of the politician so as to omit the most personal passages"

interpolate

verb insert, add, introduce, intercalate He interpolated a lot of spurious matter into the manuscript.

interpolate

verb
To put or set into, between, or among another or other things:
Translations
interpolovat
interpoloida

interpolate

[ɪnˈtɜːpəleɪt] VTinterpolar

interpolate

vt remarkeinwerfen; matter into book etcinterpolieren, einfügen; (Math) → interpolieren

interpolate

[ɪnˈtɜːpəˌleɪt] vt (frm) (remark) → interpolare
to interpolate (into) (phrase, passage) → inserire (in)
References in classic literature ?
In the present case the line bracketed is the very last which a full-grown male editor would be likely to interpolate.
I was inclined to interpolate, as I looked at him, that I had seen his first cousin in Kensington.
It's only a flesh-wound, and he isn't going to die," Sheldon managed to interpolate.
But, you know, there are always moral, spiritual causes at the back in these cases," the family doctor permitted himself to interpolate with a subtle smile.
We advise that the choice of whether and how to interpolate is ultimately a decision that must be made during the inquiry process and that no benchmarking study can dictate how to approach this activity.
In this paper we are mainly interested in sampling operators which interpolate or reproduce functions as specified in the following definition.
This process is performed on all two million pixels (1920 x 1080) in a frame to interpolate for movement in all directions.