interpose

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Related to interposed: prevails, acceded

in·ter·pose

 (ĭn′tər-pōz′)
v. in·ter·posed, in·ter·pos·ing, in·ter·pos·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To insert or introduce between parts: The ice interposes a barrier between the harbor and the islands.
b. To place (oneself) between others or things.
2. To introduce or interject (a comment, for example) during discourse or a conversation. See Synonyms at introduce.
3. To exert (influence or authority) in order to interfere or intervene: interpose one's veto.
v.intr.
1. To come between things; assume an intervening position.
2. To come between the parties in a dispute; intervene.
3. To insert a remark, question, or argument.

[French, from Old French interposer, to intervene, alteration (influenced by poser, to put, place) of Latin interpōnere, to put between : inter-, inter- + pōnere, to put; see apo- in Indo-European roots.]

in′ter·pos′al n.
in′ter·pos′er n.
in′ter·po·si′tion (-pə-zĭsh′ən) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

interpose

(ˌɪntəˈpəʊz)
vb
1. to put or place between or among other things
2. to introduce (comments, questions, etc) into a speech or conversation; interject
3. to exert or use power, influence, or action in order to alter or intervene in (a situation)
[C16: from Old French interposer, from Latin interpōnere, from inter- + pōnere to put]
ˌinterˈposable adj
ˌinterˈposal n
ˌinterˈposer n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•ter•pose

(ˌɪn tərˈpoʊz)

v. -posed, -pos•ing. v.t.
1. to place between; cause to intervene: to interpose an opaque body between a light and the eye.
2. to put in (a remark, question, etc.) in the midst of a conversation or discourse.
3. to bring (influence, action, etc.) to bear between parties or on behalf of a party.
v.i.
4. to come between other things; assume an intervening position or relation.
5. to step in between parties at variance; mediate.
6. to put in or make a remark by way of interruption.
[1590–1600; < Middle French interposer]
in`ter•pos′a•ble, adj.
in`ter•pos′al, n.
in`ter•pos′er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

interpose


Past participle: interposed
Gerund: interposing

Imperative
interpose
interpose
Present
I interpose
you interpose
he/she/it interposes
we interpose
you interpose
they interpose
Preterite
I interposed
you interposed
he/she/it interposed
we interposed
you interposed
they interposed
Present Continuous
I am interposing
you are interposing
he/she/it is interposing
we are interposing
you are interposing
they are interposing
Present Perfect
I have interposed
you have interposed
he/she/it has interposed
we have interposed
you have interposed
they have interposed
Past Continuous
I was interposing
you were interposing
he/she/it was interposing
we were interposing
you were interposing
they were interposing
Past Perfect
I had interposed
you had interposed
he/she/it had interposed
we had interposed
you had interposed
they had interposed
Future
I will interpose
you will interpose
he/she/it will interpose
we will interpose
you will interpose
they will interpose
Future Perfect
I will have interposed
you will have interposed
he/she/it will have interposed
we will have interposed
you will have interposed
they will have interposed
Future Continuous
I will be interposing
you will be interposing
he/she/it will be interposing
we will be interposing
you will be interposing
they will be interposing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been interposing
you have been interposing
he/she/it has been interposing
we have been interposing
you have been interposing
they have been interposing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been interposing
you will have been interposing
he/she/it will have been interposing
we will have been interposing
you will have been interposing
they will have been interposing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been interposing
you had been interposing
he/she/it had been interposing
we had been interposing
you had been interposing
they had been interposing
Conditional
I would interpose
you would interpose
he/she/it would interpose
we would interpose
you would interpose
they would interpose
Past Conditional
I would have interposed
you would have interposed
he/she/it would have interposed
we would have interposed
you would have interposed
they would have interposed
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.interpose - be or come between; "An interposing thicket blocked their way"
2.interpose - introduce; "God interposed death"
introduce - bring in or establish in a new place or environment; "introduce a rule"; "introduce exotic fruits"
3.interpose - to insert between other elements; "She interjected clever remarks"
cut off, disrupt, interrupt, break up - make a break in; "We interrupt the program for the following messages"
4.interpose - get involved, so as to alter or hinder an action, or through force or threat of force; "Why did the U.S. not intervene earlier in WW II?"
interact - act together or towards others or with others; "He should interact more with his colleagues"
meddle, tamper - intrude in other people's affairs or business; interfere unwantedly; "Don't meddle in my affairs!"
interlope - encroach on the rights of others, as in trading without a proper license
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

interpose

verb
1. intervene, step in, interfere, intermediate, mediate, intrude, intercede, come or place between Police had to interpose themselves between the rival groups.
2. interrupt, insert, interject, put in, introduce `He rang me just now,' she interposed.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

interpose

verb
To put or set into, between, or among another or other things:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

interpose

[ˌɪntəˈpəʊz] VT
1. (= insert) → interponer
she tried to interpose herself between themtrató de interponerse entre ellos
2. [+ remark] → interponer
"never!" interposed John-¡jamás! -interpuso John
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

interpose

vt
objectdazwischenstellen/-legen; to interpose something between two thingsetw zwischen zwei Dinge stellen/legen; to be interposed between two thingszwischen zwei Dingen stehen/liegen; to interpose oneself between two peoplesich zwischen zwei Leute stellen
(= interject) remark, questioneinwerfen; objectionvorbringen (→ into in +dat)
vi (= intervene)eingreifen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

interpose

[ˌɪntəˈpəʊz] vtintervenire
to interpose oneself between → frapporsi fra
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
"'Tis a miracle," interposed Henriette la Gaultière.
'Sorry, my dear ma'am,' he interposed. 'Never be sorry for what is so very amiable, so very good in intention, so perfectly like yourself.
'The milkman said he knew of two young ladies of the highest respectability who were in search of a suitable establishment, and he took a card,' interposed Mrs Wilfer, with severe monotony, as if she were reading an Act of Parliament aloud.
"'Tis my lord Bishop of Hereford, fellow!" interposed one of the guards fiercely.
Now this was done with so malicious a sneer, that it totally unhinged (if I may so say) the temper of the philosopher, which the bite of his tongue had somewhat ruffled; and as he was disabled from venting his wrath at his lips, he had possibly found a more violent method of revenging himself, had not the surgeon, who was then luckily in the room, contrary to his own interest, interposed and preserved the peace.
Emerging from the swamp of mangroves, abruptly they came upon a patch of sand, still so salt and inhospitable from the sea's deposit that no great trees rooted and interposed their branches between it and the sun's heat.
"Say no more," he interposed. "I was in the wrong--I lost my temper.
"Marquise, marquise!" interposed the old nobleman who had proposed the toast, "let the young people alone; let me tell you, on one's wedding day there are more agreeable subjects of conversation than dry politics."
'I am sorry to say so, my dear,' interposed the old lady, knitting on firmly, 'but I can't help it.'
'Now, my dear sir--my dear sir,' interposed the busy little man.
"That's just what it wasn't!" interposed Razumihin.
The Rajah Muda Saffir, tiring of the excuses and delays which Bududreen interposed to postpone the fulfillment of his agreement with the former, whereby he was to deliver into the hands of the rajah a certain beautiful maiden, decided at last to act upon his own initiative.