interrogation

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in·ter·ro·gate

 (ĭn-tĕr′ə-gāt′)
tr.v. in·ter·ro·gat·ed, in·ter·ro·gat·ing, in·ter·ro·gates
1. To examine by questioning formally or officially. See Synonyms at ask.
2. Computers To transmit a signal for setting off an appropriate response.

[Middle English enterrogate, from Latin interrogāre, interrogāt- : inter-, in the presence of; see inter- + rogāre, to ask; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

in·ter′ro·ga′tion n.
in·ter′ro·ga′tion·al adj.
in·ter′ro·ga′tor n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

interrogation

(ɪnˌtɛrəˈɡeɪʃən)
n
1. the technique, practice, or an instance of interrogating
2. a question or query
3. (Telecommunications) telecomm the transmission of one or more triggering pulses to a transponder
inˌterroˈgational adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•ter•ro•ga•tion

(ɪnˌtɛr əˈgeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an act of interrogating; questioning.
2. an instance of being interrogated.
3. a question; inquiry.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin]
in•ter`ro•ga′tion•al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.interrogation - a sentence of inquiry that asks for a replyinterrogation - a sentence of inquiry that asks for a reply; "he asked a direct question"; "he had trouble phrasing his interrogations"
sentence - a string of words satisfying the grammatical rules of a language; "he always spoke in grammatical sentences"
cross-question - a question asked in cross-examination
leading question - a question phrased in such a way as to suggest the desired answer; a lawyer may ask leading questions on cross-examination
yes-no question - a question that can be answered by yes or no
2.interrogation - a transmission that will trigger an answering transmission from a transponder
transmission - communication by means of transmitted signals
3.interrogation - formal systematic questioning
inquiring, questioning - a request for information
catechism - a series of question put to an individual (such as a political candidate) to elicit their views
deposition - (law) a pretrial interrogation of a witness; usually conducted in a lawyer's office
inquisition - a severe interrogation (often violating the rights or privacy of individuals)
third degree - interrogation often accompanied by torture to extort information or a confession
cross-examination - (law) close questioning of a hostile witness in a court of law to discredit or throw a new light on the testimony already provided in direct examination
direct examination - (law) the initial questioning of a witness by the party that called the witness
redirect examination, reexamination - (law) questioning of a witness by the party that called the witness after that witness has been subject to cross-examination
interview - the questioning of a person (or a conversation in which information is elicited); often conducted by journalists; "my interviews with teenagers revealed a weakening of religious bonds"
debriefing - report of a mission or task
4.interrogation - an instance of questioninginterrogation - an instance of questioning; "there was a question about my training"; "we made inquiries of all those who were present"
inquiring, questioning - a request for information
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

interrogation

noun questioning, inquiry, examination, probing, grilling (informal), cross-examination, inquisition, third degree (informal), cross-questioning the right to silence in police interrogations
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

interrogation

noun
A request for data:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
إسْتِفهام، إسْتِجْواب، تَحْقيق مع
výslech
afhøring
ispitivanje
kikérdezés
yfirheyrsla
zaslišanje
sorgulamasorguya çekme

interrogation

[ɪnˌterəˈgeɪʃən]
A. Ninterrogatorio m (Comput) → interrogación f
B. CPD interrogation mark, interrogation point (US) Nsigno m de interrogación, punto m de interrogación
interrogation room Nsala f de interrogatorios
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

interrogation

[ɪnˌtɛrəˈgeɪʃən] n
(by police, prison authorities)interrogatoire m
modern methods of interrogation → des méthodes modernes d'interrogatoire
the right to silence during police interrogations → le droit de garder le silence pendant les interrogatoires de police
(= questioning) (by interviewer, teacher, parent)interrogatoire f en règle
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

interrogation

nVerhör nt; to submit to interrogationsich verhören lassen; interrogation roomVernehmungsraum mor -zimmer nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

interrogation

[ɪnˌtɛrəˈgeɪʃn] n (of suspect, witness) → interrogatorio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

interrogate

(inˈterəgeit) verb
to question (a person) thoroughly. The police spent five hours interrogating the prisoner.
inˌterroˈgation noun
inˈterrogator noun
interrogative (intəˈrogətiv) adjective, noun
(a word) that asks a question. `Who ?' is an interrogative (pronoun).
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
"interrogational torture," to say that he can escape by informing is artificial, Shue argues, because it would demand of him a profound betrayal and violation of his integrity--at least for committed members of the opposition.
class="MsoNormalUnless concerns of child online safety are addressed, rather than the internet being an equaliser of opportunity and connectivity it may deepen interrogational cycles of deprivation.
They also examine how scholars understand the legal structures of the criminal process in relation to China's political culture, and scholarly thought on three enduring problems relating to fair trials: the presumption of innocence, interrogational torture, and the role of lawyers in the criminal trial process.
interrogational torture, see David Sussman, What's Wrong with
In legal education in the United States, an "interrogational Socratic" method of lecture is the tradition (Paliwala, 2002, p.
Turnbaugh's archive throws a harsh, interrogational light on what practicing without a license entails--during the bumpy years, before Prince had his techniques fully down, refining his cold-blooded talents and developing his willingness to freak a viewer's amygdala:
Deputy Ombudsman, Ausama Ahmed Al Asfoor, International Cooperation and Development Director Ghada Hameed Habib, and Senior Interrogational Cooperation Specialist Mariam Ahmed Abdulnoor attended the meeting.
(55) Interrogational torture, in particular, owes much of its effectiveness and pervasiveness--in the United States, (56) Syria, (57) Israel, (58) and elsewhere--to usually taking place beyond public sight, (59) in "the dark ...
Interrogational torture proves at a most basic level a highly effective means of persuasion, a corporealized rhetoric of world-shattering power (Scarry 1985; Parry 2004).
In a section on "The Mark on the Wall," for example, she writes that there are "slanting, geometrical angles," and "interrogational angles," but never ties these descriptive terms to the text by helping the reader locate these angles in the quoted passages.
(130) Second, they maintained that Congress could not, in any event, validly restrict the president from authorizing interrogational methods that he thought necessary for national security.
Marks, Interrogational Neuroimaging in Counterterrorism: A "No Brainer" or a Human Rights Hazard?, 33 AM.