interrogative sentence


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interrogative sentence

An interrogative sentence is a sentence that asks a question. Put simply, an interrogative sentence is a question. Interrogative sentences always end with question marks.
There are four main types of interrogative sentences.
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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.interrogative sentence - a sentence of inquiry that asks for a replyinterrogative sentence - a sentence of inquiry that asks for a reply; "he asked a direct question"; "he had trouble phrasing his interrogations"
sentence - a string of words satisfying the grammatical rules of a language; "he always spoke in grammatical sentences"
cross-question - a question asked in cross-examination
leading question - a question phrased in such a way as to suggest the desired answer; a lawyer may ask leading questions on cross-examination
yes-no question - a question that can be answered by yes or no
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The following example of interrogative sentence from the data is of the second type:
At least two readers drew my attention to the illustrative sentence 2b) in last week's article: 'Did the white men supposed that we had no culture?' The readers noted the error in the final -d in the word supposed in view of the fact that the interrogative sentence is introduced by the word do which is in its past form.
The mode of the sentence in question could be classified into three types, namely: news sentences (declarative), interrogative sentence (interrogative), and imperative sentences (imperative).
According to different tones, sentences of type J are divided into declarative sentence, interrogative sentence, exclamatory sentence and imperative sentence [10].
"To" is subjected to the same treatment, as in "gotta," "hafta," and "wanna." A simple interrogative sentence such as "What are you doing?" is compressed to "Whadaya doin'?" Some adults prefer the version typically rendered by children: "Whatcha doin'?" Even tighter compression is evident in "Did you eat?" Common spoken renditions are "Didja eet?" and "Ju eet?" Some manage only the almost paralytic, monosyllabic "Jeet?" This question has an appropriate answer: "No.
The use of the interrogative sentence type secures the addressee's optionality to decide, which makes the act of advising more explicit.
This is the interrogative sentence, its last word or syllable with rising intonation or inflexion, sometimes called the upspeak or Australian.
The use of falling intonation decreases the openness of the interrogative sentence type and functions as a reminder of the speaker's authority.
The situation is similar in Latvian (example 2), where the only formal means used to encode third person imperatives, the hortative particle lai + finite form of the verb, is employed in the interrogative sentence. Finally, Kuronian Livonian joins Kihnu and Latvian in using its usual strategy for forming third person imperatives, the hortative particle laz + third person imperative form of the verb marked by the suffix -g(o), in questions.
HG, for example, begins with an interrogative sentence answered by questioning:
According to Wikipedia (2007) a question mark is a punctuation mark that replaces the full stop at the end of an interrogative sentence and is often used in place of unknown or missing data.