intertextually

in·ter·tex·tu·al

 (ĭn′tər-tĕks′cho͞o-əl)
adj.
Relating to or deriving meaning from the interdependent ways in which texts stand in relation to each other.

in′ter·tex′tu·al′i·ty (-ăl′ĭ-tē) n.
in′ter·tex′tu·al·ly adv.

intertextually

(ˌɪntəˈtɛkstjʊəlɪ)
adv
in an intertextual manner
References in periodicals archive ?
Intertextually, the work alludes to Caesar's Gallic Wars, and engages with Roman poets, with Tacitus's criticisms of Germany contrasting with the praises of Italy in Vergil's Georgics.
Though Anderson was famously trenchant in his anti-establishment views, one author wrote: 'Both Gielgud and Anderson perfectly incarnated, to many, the stereotype of English upper-class conservatives, with their Received Pronunciation, and - particularly in Gielgud's case - imposing acting style.' (7) Some of the impact of their scenes derives intertextually from what one knows of Anderson's caustic views (it is hard to resist the suspicion that some irony underlies the speech his character delivers about greatness and patriotism to Cambridge undergraduates!) and Gielgud's status as a classical acting icon.
As its intertextually resonant title would suggest, Love's Metamorphosis is self-consciously Ovidian, and its plot hinges on the (mostly reversible) bodily transformations of various female characters into trees, flowers, rocks, birds, and even men.
Thinking back to readers' sometimes complex motivations, I am reminded of MacLachlan and Reid's Framing and Interpretation (1994) where they argue that we can approach reading through four frames: extratextually (who I am as a reader and what I bring to the text), circumtextually (what sits around the text to invite me in/keep me out), intertextually (how I make meaning of this text through what I know of other texts) and intratextually (what sits within the text to generate meaning).
Similarly, the volume as a whole presents itself with a purposeful lack of clear conclusivity, or even linear sequencing: the stories exist as loosely correlated chapters, connected intertextually to other narratives in other volumes.
(9) It seems intertextually to the point as well, for reasons that will become apparent, that Papingo finally commends his spirit, as he leaves behind the corrupt court of worldly pomp, 'to the Quene of Farie, / Eternalie into hir Court to tarie'.
Besides bringing his knowledge of the Great War effectively to bear, Sherry deals suggestively with a mechanically inflected ballet and proposes a reading of Hugh Selwyn Mauberley that invokes intertextually a story by Max Beerbohm.
The fugitive theme of carpe diem combined with lament clearly invokes the sense of human loss, love, and decay that shadows love lyrics in English--most influentially perhaps in Shakespeare's sonnets--invoking, intertextually, the passionate strain that enriches the poem.
Intertextually, one can recognize an allusion to Appolinaire's enigmatic verse "Soleil cou coupe" (in Zome).
Titscher et al (2000) state that discourses are intertextually connected to other discourses.
(eds.), Reading Job Intertextually, New York: Bloomsbury, 2013.
Raine's works, thus, form an unintentionally conceived trilogy of plays that intertextually interact with each other.