intervening variable


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intervening variable

n
1. (Mathematics) psychol a hypothetical variable postulated to account for the way in which a set of independent variables control a set of dependent variables
2. (Psychology) psychol a hypothetical variable postulated to account for the way in which a set of independent variables control a set of dependent variables
References in periodicals archive ?
MacCorquodale and Meehl (1948) differentiated between a hypothetical construct and an intervening variable in that the latter is simply a name or label of a relation between independent and dependent variables and does not involve hypotheses about the existence of unobserved entities or processes underlying such a relation.
This may suggest that there may be an intervening variable or path, unspecified and unmeasured in the model, between employee's psychological state and intention to leave.
Because drive is defined as an intervening variable, it cannot be described by the behavior it presumably controls.
Authors identify the context as an intervening variable to explain the different effects of globalization among Asian societies.
Yet, others view it as an intervening variable between stressors and strain (e.g., Eckenrode, 1983; Gore, 1987).
Part II, entitled 'Culture and Ethnicity' consists of four chapters discussing the impact of cultural diversity on the experience of occupational stress, including a multinational comparison of the relationship between occupational stress and psychological 'strain', and coping as an intervening variable in this relationship.
The paths depicting the direct impact of gender, age, education and tenure on the intervening variable of empowerment also were not significant.
Change in this context is also an intervening variable because it acts to mask the expression of other variables, then causes a spurious relationship (Vandervoort, 1992).
The book uses a Neoclassical Realist framework that treats nationalism as an intervening variable that mediates between external, systemic pressures and foreign policy outcomes.
Alo and Cancado (this issue) make the case that the concept of motivation is best described in terms of an intervening variable. Although we agree with some aspects of Alo and Cancado's arguments, such as the need to have a clear definition of motivation, we disagree with their analysis on a number of fundamental points.
Much of the political-sociological research on Asia, Africa, and Latin America in the past two decades has introduced the state as an intervening variable while examining the relationship between foreign capital and industrial growth (Rubinson, 1977; Stepan, 1978; Evans et al., 1985; Evans and Stephens, 1988; Chu, 1989; Kaufman, 1990; Gereffi and Wyman, 1990; Bradshaw and Wahl, 1991; Pattnayak, 1994).