interventionism


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Related to interventionism: interventionist

in·ter·ven·tion·ism

 (ĭn′tər-vĕn′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The policy or practice of intervening, especially:
a. The policy of intervening in the affairs of another sovereign state.
b. The use of government power to control or influence domestic economic activity.

in•ter•ven•tion•ism

(ˌɪn tərˈvɛn ʃəˌnɪz əm)

n.
the policy or doctrine of intervening, esp. government interference in the affairs of another state.
[1920–25]
in`ter•ven′tion•ist, n., adj.

interventionism

the doctrine supporting intervention, especially in international affairs and the politics of other countries. — interventionist, n., adj.
See also: Politics
Translations

interventionism

[ˌɪntəˈvenʃənɪzəm] Nintervencionismo m

interventionism

[ˌɪntəˈvɛnʃnɪzm] ninterventismo
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References in periodicals archive ?
"China is interested to cooperate with Iran to counter interventionism and get out of the situation so that the deal will be fully implemented," he said.
"We've had enough interventionism, here we have dignity, damn it!" he said in a televised address from the presidential palace.
Our system doesn't have mechanisms for major state interventionism in such situations.
He added that he believes that "the foreign interventionism we had so far was detrimental to BiH, and it produced nothing substantial".
Summary: To watch the debate play out in America's news media, it would seem that the opposite of "America First" is American interventionism: a chronic penchant for leaping, to no apparent end, into wars of choice and demonstrating America's unrivaled military power.
Cuba's relations with the US thawed under former president Barack Obama but have cooled again under President Donald Trump, whose administration Castro accused of speaking about his country"disrespectfully, aggressively, with interventionism and a clumsy manipulation of the historic truth."
If you didn't know better, you might have thought it was 2016 and Trump was still a presidential candidate trying to separate himself from the knee-jerk interventionism that has defined U.S.
The great heretic against classical ACR--a veritable Luther, McDougall writes--was, of course, Woodrow Wilson, whose feckless interventionism grew from the conviction that "the way to serve God was to sacrifice national interests on the altar of humanity" (137).
But one element of the issue never seems to get adequately aired--the matter of whether humanitarian interventionism ever really makes much sense for a government whose first responsibility is to its citizens.
Hurd reinforced this claim by introducing and refuting three myths on how US foreign policy intersected with religious interventionism. In introducing Hurd, NU-Q professor Zachary Wright said she "speaks insightfully about the ways in which the continued public importance of religious identities has necessitated the readjustment of secularising political discourses".
foreign policy intersects with religious interventionism.

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