intonation

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in·to·na·tion

 (ĭn′tə-nā′shən, -tō-)
n.
1.
a. The act of intoning or chanting.
b. An intoned utterance.
2. A manner of producing or uttering tones, especially with regard to accuracy of pitch.
3. Linguistics The use of changing pitch to convey syntactic information: a questioning intonation.
4. A use of pitch characteristic of a speaker or dialect: "He could hear authority, the old parish intonation coming back into his voice" (Graham Greene).
5. Music The opening phrase of a plainsong composition sung as a solo part.

in′to·na′tion·al adj.

intonation

(ˌɪntəʊˈneɪʃən)
n
1. (Phonetics & Phonology) the sound pattern of phrases and sentences produced by pitch variation in the voice
2. the act or manner of intoning
3. an intoned, chanted, or monotonous utterance; incantation
4. (Classical Music) music the opening of a piece of plainsong, sung by a soloist
5. (Classical Music) music
a. the correct or accurate pitching of intervals
b. the capacity to play or sing in tune. See also just intonation
ˌintoˈnational adj

in•to•na•tion

(ˌɪn toʊˈneɪ ʃən, -tə-)

n.
1. the pattern or melody of pitch changes in connected speech, esp. the pitch pattern of a sentence, which distinguishes kinds of sentences or speakers of different language cultures.
2. the act or manner of intonating.
3. the ability to produce musical tones on pitch.
4. something that is intoned.
5. the opening phrase of a Gregorian chant.
[< Medieval Latin]
in`to•na′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intonation - rise and fall of the voice pitchintonation - rise and fall of the voice pitch  
prosody, inflection - the patterns of stress and intonation in a language
intonation pattern - intonations characteristic of questions and requests and statements
droning, monotone, drone - an unchanging intonation
singsong - a regular and monotonous rising and falling intonation
2.intonation - singing by a soloist of the opening piece of plainsong
singing, vocalizing - the act of singing vocal music
3.intonation - the act of singing in a monotonous toneintonation - the act of singing in a monotonous tone
singing, vocalizing - the act of singing vocal music
cantillation - liturgical chanting
4.intonation - the production of musical tones (by voice or instrument); especially the exactitude of the pitch relations
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
fixed intonation - the intonation of keyboard instruments where the pitch of each note is fixed and cannot be varied by the performer

intonation

noun
1. tone, inflection, cadence, modulation, accentuation His voice had a very slight German intonation.
2. incantation, spell, charm, formula, chant, invocation, hex (U.S. & Canad. informal), conjuration They could hear strange music and chanting intonations.

intonation

noun
A particular vocal quality that indicates some emotion or feeling:
Idiom: tone of voice.
Translations
تَغَيُّر في حِدَّة الصَّوْت
intonace
intonation
intonáció
ítónun; hljómfall
intonacija
intonācija
intonácia
intonacija
tonlama

intonation

[ˌɪntəʊˈneɪʃən] Nentonación f

intonation

[ˌɪntəˈneɪʃən] nintonation f

intonation

nIntonation f; (Ling also) → Satzmelodie f

intonation

[ˌɪntəʊˈneɪʃn] n (Linguistics) → intonazione f

intonation

(intəˈneiʃən) noun
the rise and fall of the voice in speech.
References in periodicals archive ?
Partch's theoretical work, from its beginnings in the early 1920s, took root in his dissatisfaction with the intonational and conceptual paradigm of equal temperament.
His dense, compressed language makes use of all the connotative overtones of a phrase and of all the intonational potentials of the individual word, qualities that no translation can ever reveal.
passages showing intonational accent involve case forms of anya- other than the nominative whereas five of the seven unaccented passages do" (p.
Shifts in language therefore provide the only clue in detecting this novelistic equivalent of plagiarism, which Bakhtin labels 'intonational quotation marks'.
He contends that the idiom, when seen as a vocal genre, consists of a synthesis of complicated rhythms, intonational systems, motivic developments, song structure, performance practices, textures, orchestrations, and instrumentalism, within the wider context of all vocalizing styles.
Intonational variance under changes in pitch range and length.
He also tallies the percentages of nouns, adjectives, or monosyllabic words in a text, and the recurrence of words, phrases, sounds, syntactical structures or prepositions, or whole intonational patterns.
This paper uses the AM approach to analyze the phonetic characteristics of key intonational events in nonnative Spanish.