intracranial

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in·tra·cra·ni·al

 (ĭn′trə-krā′nē-əl)
adj.
Occurring or situated within the cranium.

in′tra·cra′ni·al·ly adv.

intracranial

(ˌɪntrəˈkreɪnɪəl)
adj
(Anatomy) within the skull

in•tra•cra•ni•al

(ˌɪn trəˈkreɪ ni əl)

adj.
being or occurring within the skull.
[1840–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.intracranial - within the skull
Translations
nitrolební

in·tra·cra·ni·al

a. intracraneal, dentro del cráneo.

intracranial

adj intracraneal, endocraneal, intracraneano
References in periodicals archive ?
To the Editor: With the advent of antibiotics application, intracranial complications of paranasal sinusitis, including meningitis, intracranial abscess, subdural empyema (SDE), epidural abscess, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and thrombosis of other dural sinuses, have become uncommon.[1] However, SDE is still a life-threatening disease entity.
Meningitis and intracranial abscess due to Granulicatella elegans are very rare and frequently seen after intracranial operations [4].
Nadiminti, "Intracranial abscess from embolic Serratia marcescens endocarditis," The Lancet Infectious Diseases, vol.
No evidence of adjacent intracranial abscess formation or sinus thrombosis.
His intracranial abscess was surgically drained as part of a hemicraniectomy procedure.
Methods: We analyzed 100 cases of intracranial abscess, treated surgically from January 2015 and October 2016 at Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC).
Successful medical treatment of intracranial abscess caused by Brucella spp.
Given the increased intracranial abscess size, she underwent a craniotomy with microsurgical dissection, resection of the right parietal nodular lesion and placement of a subgaleal drain and a cranial titanium plate.
(3) More specifically, otomastoiditis, when occurring in immunosuppressed patients, has the potential to progress to serious, life-threatening intracranial complications including meningitis, intracranial abscess, and lateral sinus thrombosis.
Infectious process can spread to the intracranial compartment ending up with meningitis, intracranial abscess, venous sinus thrombosis and death when the infection is not treated effectively.1 The complications in adult cases are rare and most of them have an underlying immune suppression such as diabetes, renal failure, malignancies, positive serology for HIV, long-term usage of immuno-suppressant agents.2-9 In our patient, mastoiditis and facial nerve involvement were present as infratemporal complications of acute OM.
aureus suggesting that the sign of murine intracranial abscess was not exactly the same as human intracranial abscess.