intracranial

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in·tra·cra·ni·al

 (ĭn′trə-krā′nē-əl)
adj.
Occurring or situated within the cranium.

in′tra·cra′ni·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

intracranial

(ˌɪntrəˈkreɪnɪəl)
adj
(Anatomy) within the skull
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•tra•cra•ni•al

(ˌɪn trəˈkreɪ ni əl)

adj.
being or occurring within the skull.
[1840–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.intracranial - within the skull
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
nitrolební

in·tra·cra·ni·al

a. intracraneal, dentro del cráneo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

intracranial

adj intracraneal, endocraneal, intracraneano
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Presented in an outline format, this book provides differential diagnoses for about 230 symptoms, physical and radiological signs, and other abnormal findings in neurology and neurosurgery, organized by epidemiological characteristics of neurological diseases, neuroradiology, developmental and acquired anomalies and pediatric disorders, cranial nerve disorders, neuro-ophthalmology, intracranial tumors, demyelinating diseases and brain atrophy, stroke, spinal disorders, peripheral nerve disorders, movement disorders, neurotrauma, infections of the central nervous system, pain, and neurorehabilitation.
Meningiomas are the most common primary extra-axial non-glial intracranial tumors, comprise approximately 14-20% of all intracranial tumors.1,2 Meningiomas commonly occur on the brain surface and rarely in the brain ventricles.
Meningiomas are the most common non-glial intracranial tumors, which account for 14%-19% of all intracranial lesions (1).
Choroid plexus cells are neuroepithelial cells that line the intraventricular papillae and secrete cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).[1] Choroid plexus tumors (CPTs) are rare intracranial tumors that account for 2-5% of all pediatric brain cancers, to date, seldom reported.[2] According to the histological classification of the World Health Organization (WHO), CPTs can be divided into choroid plexus papilloma (CPP), atypical choroid plexus papilloma (aCPP), and choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC).[3] CPTs usually occur in children younger than 2 years, with about 10-20% of cases found in patients younger than 1 year.[4] The WHO classification of 2007 first mentioned aCPP, which carried at least a 5-fold increase in the risk of 5-year recurrence compared with CPP.
By condition, hydrocephalus, aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, and pituitary and intracranial tumors are the segments into which this market is divided.
Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is seen in head trauma, hydrocephalus, intracranial hemorrhage, sub-arachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured brain aneurysm, intracranial tumors, hepatic encephalopathy and cerebral edema, which can lead to death or devastating neurological damage.
Extraneural metastasis in intracranial tumors in children: the experience of a single center.
In this study, we investigated the performance of early response after CyberKnife (CK) stereotactic treatment on 29 patients with intracranial tumors through [[sup.18]F]ML-10 PET/CT imaging with voxel-by-voxel analysis.
Primary intracranial germ cell tumors are neoplasms that predominantly occur within the pediatric population and account for 0-4-3.4% of primary intracranial tumors [7].
They have been reported to occur extracranially in only 1-2% of cases, and 20% of extracranial meningiomas are secondary extensions of intracranial tumors [5].
Bakar and Tekkok [8] described a case of undifferentiated ovarian carcinoma in a patient whose presenting symptoms were headache and vision changes, for which subsequent imaging demonstrated multiple ring-enhancing intracranial tumors. Mastsunami [9] reported a case of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma (endometrioid type) of ovarian origin in a woman whose presenting symptoms were progressive nausea, fatigue, and headache due to a solitary intracranial tumor.
Headache in intracranial tumors. Cephalalgia 1999;19(9):787-90.