intragenerational mobility

Related to intragenerational mobility: horizontal mobility

intragenerational mobility

(ˌɪntrəˌdʒɛnəˈreɪʃənəl)
n
(Sociology) sociol movement within or between social classes and occupations, the change occurring within an individual's lifetime. Compare intergenerational mobility
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References in periodicals archive ?
It is not feasible to compare intergenerational mobility over time in the way we have done for intragenerational mobility. Unfortunately, it requires far more reliable data than is available now.
If intragenerational mobility is high, then any snapshot of inequality will overstate the actual long-term inequality among individuals.
Heterogeneity in intragenerational mobility also is apparent across the income distribution.
But when the assumption that measures of intragenerational mobility are invariant over the time period measured is dropped and tested using moving 5-year windows that allow us to measure mobility before and after reunification for this population, we find evidence that a great social transformation, in this case German reunification, is coincident with a significant decline in their income mobility.
In addition to the Shorrocks R, we examine trends in intragenerational mobility using decomposition methods developed by Gottschalk and Moffitt (1994).
Keywords: economic mobility, intragenerational mobility, inequality, income distribution, public policy
The type of economic mobility that we have illustrated thus far is called relative intragenerational mobility, which will be the primary focus of our data analysis in the next section.
that intragenerational mobility among young adults has been stable since
At least two processes may be relevant in this respect: a) specific patterns of intragenerational mobility (Mateju and Lim, 1995, (Mateju and Rehakova, 1993), and b) changes in relevant social hierarchies (socio-economic status, prestige, etc.) which generate feelings of collective mobility (Mateju, 1996a).
A methodology suitable for analysing mobility needs a theoretical framework which must take into account the two forms which mobility can take: (a) intergenerational mobility and (b) intragenerational mobility. In the case of intergenerational mobility, the focus of analysis is on mobility between the past and the present generations, but in the case of intragenerational mobility it is the mobility within one and the same generation that constitutes the object of study.