intramundane

intramundane

(ˌɪntrəˈmʌndeɪn)
adj
existing or located within the world
References in periodicals archive ?
Even Heidegger, the great Heidegger, prudently translated in France, firmly supported the theme of the possible "authenticity" of human intramundane existence.
along with Balthasar, and in extended engagement with Heidegger, argues that the true vocation of metaphysics is not to close off wonder or to yoke God to some intramundane reality but to discover being's ecstatic character and hence its movement to what is ever "beyond.
Hence, the message is that the mourning widower has to make the life-giving vigor of this knowledge accessible to himself--in away that certainly does not devalue his earlier claim to an enduring, intramundane happiness.
This sense of metaphor also characterizes the intramundane.
radically divorced from traditional theological constraints and radically reoriented toward the intramundane dimension of existence.
As the history and the philosophy of religions prove, when the individual does not invest in the connection with transcendence understood as a transmundane reality, he will seek to discover sacredness in intramundane manifestations, or he will project the dimension of sacredness upon significant elements of his aspirations and his daily life.
Indeed, intramundane causality is limited to this re-forming, and
In its place, the intramundane faith of "Americanism" meets the pressing need to transform and perfect the world.
Through Christie, Johnson recuperates a sense of individual dislocation as a significant act, rendered as a spatialized "facticity," so that the apparently ordinary, essentially intramundane, environment of city life is transformed into something hostile and fascinating.
Yet there remains a radical difference insofar as the move beyond occurs in the intramundane encounter with the Other.
Leibniz on Divine Foreknowledge," Faith and Philosophy 11 (1994): 547-71; John Carriero, "Leibniz on Infinite Resolution and IntraMundane Contingency, Part Two: Necessity, Contingency, and the Divine Faculties," Studia Leibnitiana 27 (1995): 1-30; Jack Davidson, "Untying the Knot: Leibniz on God's Knowledge of Future Contingents," History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (1996): 89-116.
When these ideas are extracted from their fictional context, they amount to nothing save a false political "ideal" antithetical to the author's religion: "In spite of the far-reaching decomposition of his Christianity, More is still too much of a Christian to be an intramundane eschatologist like the later Progressivists, Positivists, and Marxists.
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