intransitive


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transitive and intransitive verbs

English verbs are split into two major categories depending on how they function in a sentence: transitive and intransitive. Transitive verbs take one or more objects in a sentence, while intransitive verbs take no objects in a sentence.
Put simply, a transitive verb describes an action that is happening to something or someone, which is known as the verb’s direct object.
An intransitive verb, on the other hand, describes an action that does not happen to something or someone.
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in·tran·si·tive

 (ĭn-trăn′sĭ-tĭv, -zĭ-)
adj. Abbr. intr. or int. or i.
Designating a verb or verb construction that does not require or cannot take a direct object, as snow or sleep.
n.
An intransitive verb.

in·tran′si·tive·ly adv.
in·tran′si·tive·ness, in·tran′si·tiv′i·ty n.

intransitive

(ɪnˈtrænsɪtɪv)
adj
1. (Grammar)
a. denoting a verb when it does not require a direct object
b. denoting a verb that customarily does not require a direct object: "to faint" is an intransitive verb.
c. (as noun) a verb in either of these categories
2. (Grammar) denoting an adjective or noun that does not require any particular noun phrase as a referent
3. (Logic) logic maths (of a relation) having the property that if it holds between one argument and a second, and between the second and a third, it must fail to hold between the first and the third: "being the mother of" is an intransitive relation.
inˈtransitively adv
inˌtransiˈtivity, inˈtransitiveness n

in•tran•si•tive

(ɪnˈtræn sɪ tɪv)
adj.
1. of or being a verb that indicates a complete action without being accompanied by a direct object, as sit or lie, and that in English does not form a passive.
n.
2. an intransitive verb.
[1605–15; < Late Latin]
in•tran′si•tive•ly, adv.
in•tran′si•tive•ness, in•tran`si•tiv′i•ty, n.

intransitive

Used to describe a verb that does not have a direct object. Compare transitive.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intransitive - a verb (or verb construction) that does not take an object
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
Adj.1.intransitive - designating a verb that does not require or cannot take a direct object
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
transitive - designating a verb that requires a direct object to complete the meaning
Translations
فِعْل لازِم
nepřechodný
intransitiv
intransitiivinen
tárgyatlan
áhrifslaus
intranzityviaiintranzityvusnegalininkinis
nepārejošs
nieprzechodni
intransitiv
neprechodný
geçişsiznesnesiz

intransitive

[ɪnˈtrænsɪtɪv] ADJ (Ling) → intransitivo

intransitive

[ɪnˈtrænsɪtɪv] adjintransitif/ive intransitive verbintransitive verb nverbe m intransitifintra-uterine device nstérilet m, dispositif m intra-utérin

intransitive

adj verbintransitiv
nIntransitiv nt

intransitive

[ɪnˈtrænsɪtɪv] adj (Gram) → intransitivo/a

intransitive

(inˈtrӕnsitiv) adjective
(of a verb) that does not have an object. The baby lay on the floor and kicked; Go and fetch the book!
inˈtransitively adverb
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, in this paper, we aim to analyse the alternating behaviour of the location argument not only in transitive examples such as those exemplified above but also in intransitive sentences in English by using the analytical descriptive tools of Role and Reference Grammar (Van Valin and LaPolla 1997; Van Valin 2005), a functional theory which assumes that lexical meaning conditions the morphosyntactic structure of sentences and that this relationship can be explained by describing the interface mechanism which links meaning to syntactic structure.
As we can see in (61a), verbs of this class exhibit an intransitive form, which, according to Amaral (2015) and unlike Levin and Rappaport Hovav (1992), Levin (1993) and Haspelmath (1993), differs from inchoative alternation since this one is exclusive of change of state verbs.
In this text we do not issue any claims as to universal tendencies in the voice systems of the world, however the particular claim made by de Schepps that reflexive and reciprocal meanings constitute the step between transitive and intransitive structures is not upheld by OCS material, in which anticausatives (and not reflexives or reciprocals) outnumber other groups of reflexively marked verbs.
WP1 uses grammaticality judgment and elicited production paradigms developed by the PI to investigate the acquisition of basic transitive and intransitive sentence structure (e.
When one pairwise comparison suspends addition and the other does not, the result is an intransitive value judgement: J < J + < K < J, producing the mere addition paradox.
Hatred here is intransitive - it has no direct object.
Rice 1988; Hoche 2009; Ogata 2011); (vi) and the comparison, due to their semantic closeness, between COCs and intransitive patterns with adverbial modification, like (4), on the one hand, and light verb constructions of the type illustrated in (5), on the other (e.
Past perfect progressive tense of intransitive verb I am thinking.
The Merriam-Webster Dictionary (online) defines crock as an intransitive verb: "to transfer color (as when rubbed or washed).
Since for many such verbs, present passives with the suffix -ya- are the only regular intransitive derivative within the I[ndividual] V[erbal] S[ystem], they could occasionally take over the anticausative function, (p.
Mathematical equations are presented for modeling auction bids, risk aversion, bracketing decisions, intransitive preferences, prospect theory, procrastination, and hindsight bias.
With this book as guide, students can deal with tricky prepositions, know the distinction between transitive and intransitive verb (they will not be caught saying "advocate for" or "seek for").