intransitive


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transitive and intransitive verbs

English verbs are split into two major categories depending on how they function in a sentence: transitive and intransitive. Transitive verbs take one or more objects in a sentence, while intransitive verbs take no objects in a sentence.
Put simply, a transitive verb describes an action that is happening to something or someone, which is known as the verb’s direct object.
An intransitive verb, on the other hand, describes an action that does not happen to something or someone.
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in·tran·si·tive

 (ĭn-trăn′sĭ-tĭv, -zĭ-)
adj. Abbr. intr. or int. or i.
Designating a verb or verb construction that does not require or cannot take a direct object, as snow or sleep.
n.
An intransitive verb.

in·tran′si·tive·ly adv.
in·tran′si·tive·ness, in·tran′si·tiv′i·ty n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

intransitive

(ɪnˈtrænsɪtɪv)
adj
1. (Grammar)
a. denoting a verb when it does not require a direct object
b. denoting a verb that customarily does not require a direct object: "to faint" is an intransitive verb.
c. (as noun) a verb in either of these categories
2. (Grammar) denoting an adjective or noun that does not require any particular noun phrase as a referent
3. (Logic) logic maths (of a relation) having the property that if it holds between one argument and a second, and between the second and a third, it must fail to hold between the first and the third: "being the mother of" is an intransitive relation.
inˈtransitively adv
inˌtransiˈtivity, inˈtransitiveness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•tran•si•tive

(ɪnˈtræn sɪ tɪv)
adj.
1. of or being a verb that indicates a complete action without being accompanied by a direct object, as sit or lie, and that in English does not form a passive.
n.
2. an intransitive verb.
[1605–15; < Late Latin]
in•tran′si•tive•ly, adv.
in•tran′si•tive•ness, in•tran`si•tiv′i•ty, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

intransitive

Used to describe a verb that does not have a direct object. Compare transitive.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intransitive - a verb (or verb construction) that does not take an object
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
Adj.1.intransitive - designating a verb that does not require or cannot take a direct object
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
transitive - designating a verb that requires a direct object to complete the meaning
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
فِعْل لازِم
nepřechodný
intransitiv
intransitiivinen
tárgyatlan
áhrifslaus
intranzityviaiintranzityvusnegalininkinis
nepārejošs
nieprzechodni
intransitiv
neprechodný
geçişsiznesnesiz

intransitive

[ɪnˈtrænsɪtɪv] ADJ (Ling) → intransitivo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

intransitive

[ɪnˈtrænsɪtɪv] adjintransitif/ive intransitive verbintransitive verb nverbe m intransitifintra-uterine device nstérilet m, dispositif m intra-utérin
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

intransitive

adj verbintransitiv
nIntransitiv nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

intransitive

[ɪnˈtrænsɪtɪv] adj (Gram) → intransitivo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

intransitive

(inˈtrӕnsitiv) adjective
(of a verb) that does not have an object. The baby lay on the floor and kicked; Go and fetch the book!
inˈtransitively adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Biblical Hebrew grammarians, lexicographers, and translators have long recognized a group of Biblical Hebrew verbs that, though typically intransitive, can take what appears to be an object, he says, and though almost every modern Biblical Hebrew grammar identifies and discusses the phenomenon, they are brief and vague about the linguistic processes at work.
Schemes such as maximizing social welfare through voting can often lead to irrational, intransitive outcomes, even when all affected persons are given an equal opportunity to vote.
It once was but an intransitive verb that meant, according to Webster's, "to utter successive chirping noises" or "to talk in a chattering fashion." As a noun, it meant "a small tremulous intermittent sound" or a "light silly laugh."
First, "to lie" is an intransitive verb, meaning it doesn't take a direct object.
part of speech may be transitive or intransitive? WHERE...
Predicative possession encodes the possessive relationship between a possessor and a possessee either in the form of a syntactically transitive construction (habeo-possessive constructions) or a syntactically intransitive one (existential sentences or esse-possessive constructions) (Stassen 2013).
Another example is the use of un/fold in its intransitive: the unfolding of a story is not the opposite of the folding of a theatre production.
36) and the verb is first person intransitive ab=a=d?.
Thus, in this paper, we aim to analyse the alternating behaviour of the location argument not only in transitive examples such as those exemplified above but also in intransitive sentences in English by using the analytical descriptive tools of Role and Reference Grammar (Van Valin and LaPolla 1997; Van Valin 2005), a functional theory which assumes that lexical meaning conditions the morphosyntactic structure of sentences and that this relationship can be explained by describing the interface mechanism which links meaning to syntactic structure.