intraparietal


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intraparietal

(ˌɪntrəpəˈraɪɪtəl)
adj
1. (Anatomy) situated within the walls of a hollow organ
2. (Anatomy) situated within the parietal lobe of the cerebrum
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
(19, 21) Finally, neurons in the lateral intraparietal (LIP) area encoded the value of social information when this value signal was used to guide a decision about where to look.
Repair of complex giant or recurrent ventral hernias by using tension-free intraparietal prosthetic mesh (Stoppa technique): lessons learned from our initial experience (fifty patients).
They concluded that visual discomfort due to excessive screen disparities was caused by sensory and/or motor phenomena that involved the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) regions, the frontal eye field (FEF), and premotor cortex [10].
Other cognitive alterations were observed for functions involving spatial transformations of body parts that appear to involve posterior and superior parietal regions and intraparietal regions (cf.
The fusion results indicate that the intraparietal sulcus and frontal executive areas are the primary sources of biasing influences on task-related visual cortex, whereas task-unrelated default mode network and sensorimotor cortex are suppressive during visual attention [16].
Matelli, "Largely segregated parietofrontal connections linking rostral intraparietal cortex (areas AIP and VIP) and the ventral premotor cortex (areas F5 and F4)," Experimental Brain Research, vol.
We used the following coordinates: AP, +3.2 mm from the interaural midpoint; ML, +2.0 mm from the intraparietal suture; and DV, -6.5 mm from the dura mater [19].
They said: "We found greater bilateral activations in premotor cortex and intraparietal sulcus, right superior parietal lobe and left posterior superior temporal sulcus when expert dancers viewed movements that they had been trained to perform compared to movements they had not" (1243).
In the presence of post-central gyrus and intraparietal sulcus damage in patients who have had a stroke, the recovery of motor functions is definitely worse (76).