intrapersonal

(redirected from intrapersonally)
Also found in: Medical.

in·tra·per·son·al

 (ĭn′trə-pûr′sə-nəl)
adj.
Existing or occurring within the individual self or mind.

in′tra·per′son·al·ly adv.

intrapersonal

(ˌɪntrəˈpɜːsənəl)
adj
occurring within a person's mind
References in periodicals archive ?
Intrapersonally (akin to epistemically; Samuelson et al.
Intrapersonally, excessive thumos is a sign of a lack of harmony in the soul, a kind of internal faction or division.
This concept relates to how the individual deals with emotional information, intrapersonally and interpersonally.
international relations, development aid, structural inequality) as well as an increased ability to critically interpret these issues; intrapersonally, volunteers came to understand themselves independent of the perspectives of others; and interpersonally, volunteers expressed a greater capacity to develop relationships with people different than themselves (i.
Drama sequences wherein students have written and directed on-campus plays about how to better handle roommate conflicts, engage in healthy lifestyles, set quit dates, and tap support systems have been cited as both interpersonally bonding and intrapersonally meaningful.
Rarely would one come out and speak either sentence in the beginning stages with a stranger either, but intrapersonally (-inside the skin") surely we are making an evaluation.
GRC can be experienced intrapersonally (within self) or interpersonally when it is expressed toward others or when it is caused by others.
Arkowitz further noted that resistance may emerge intrapersonally (i.
This requires that the scale be intrapersonally cardinal.
These more positive interactions are internalized intrapersonally (within a person), with direct, corresponding impact on the person's self-esteem.
The postnatal period was experienced as being the most interpersonally and intrapersonally challenging in terms of coping with the new reality of becoming a father.
Moreno's approach to trauma was largely opposed to Freud's who had considered trauma intrapersonally in the limited context of the family.