intrauterine device


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intrauterine device

n. Abbr. IUD
A usually T-shaped device that is inserted into the uterus to prevent pregnancy, often wrapped in copper or containing a progestin.

intrauterine device

n
(Gynaecology & Obstetrics) a metal or plastic device, in the shape of a loop, coil, or ring, inserted into the uterus to prevent conception. Abbreviation: IUD

intrau′terine device`


n.
any of various contrivances, as a loop or coil, for insertion into the uterus as a contraceptive.
Abbr.: IUD
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intrauterine device - contraceptive device consisting of a piece of bent plastic or metal that is inserted through the vagina into the uterus
loop - an intrauterine device in the shape of a loop
Translations
dispositif intra-utérinDIUstérilet
gimdos ertmės pesaras
antikoncepčné vnútromaternicové teliesko

intrauterine device

IUD

(ˌai juː ˈdiː) noun (abbreviation)
intrauterine device; a plastic or metal contraceptive used by women.
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 PRESSWIRE-August 22, 2019-: Global Hormonal Contraceptive Market Outlook to 2026: Analysis on Pill, Intrauterine Device (IUD), Patch, Implant, Vaginal Ring, Injectable Methods
The Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) trial released study results comparing the relative risk of HIV acquisition among women using one of the following three contraceptive methods: the injectable contraceptive DMPA-IM; the Jadelle LNG-implant; and a copper intrauterine device, or IUD.
Obstetrician-gynecologists and the intrauterine device: A survey of attitudes and practice.
Other causes may be unsuccessful tubal ligation, pregnancy due to an intrauterine device (IUD) and infertility treatment.
This approval Is based on efficacy and safety data from ACCESS US, the largest ongoing intrauterine device (IUD) Phase 3 clinical trial in the United States.
"North Korean women often use an intrauterine device (IUD), often called a loop, as a method of contraception that inserts a small ring of plastic or copper around the uterus," said Lee Hae-won, a doctor of family medicine at Seoul Medical Center.
This US FDA approval was based on a review of additional efficacy and safety data from the partnership's largest ongoing intrauterine system (IUS), known as intrauterine device (IUD), Phase 3 clinical trial in the US, ACCESS IUS (A Comprehensive Contraceptive Efficacy & Safety Study of an IUS), with 1,751 US women receiving LILETTA.
The researchers observed increases in use of one or more contraceptive methods at last sex (78 to 88 percent), dual-method use (24 to 33 percent), long-acting reversible contraception, including intrauterine device and implant (1 to 7 percent), withdrawal (15 to 26 percent), and withdrawal in combination with other methods (7 to 17 percent) in 2007 to 2014.
Intrauterine device (IUD) insertion is a long-acting and one of the most effective modes of reversible contraception [1].
In the Surveillance Summary "Disparities in Preconception Health Indicators--Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2013-2015, and Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, 2013-2014," on page 7, the second sentence under the heading "Postpartum Use of Contraception (PRAMS)" should have read "The most effective methods (i.e., male or female sterilization, implant, and intrauterine device) have a failure rate that is <1% with typical use, and moderately effective methods (shot, pill, patch, ring or diaphragm) include those with typical failure rates of 6%-12%."
Complications seen with an intrauterine device are relatively uncommon but can be serious; examples include a lost IUD and uterine perforation [6].

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