intrepid


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in·trep·id

 (ĭn-trĕp′ĭd)
adj.
Resolutely courageous; fearless. See Synonyms at brave.

[Latin intrepidus : in-, not; see in-1 + trepidus, alarmed.]

in′tre·pid′i·ty (-trə-pĭd′ĭ-tē), in·trep′id·ness n.
in·trep′id·ly adv.

intrepid

(ɪnˈtrɛpɪd)
adj
fearless; daring; bold
[C17: from Latin intrepidus, from in-1 + trepidus fearful, timid]
ˌintreˈpidity, inˈtrepidness n
inˈtrepidly adv

in•trep•id

(ɪnˈtrɛp ɪd)

adj.
fearless; dauntless: an intrepid explorer.
[1690–1700; < Latin intrepidus=in- in-3 + trepidus anxious; compare trepidation]
in`tre•pid′i•ty, in•trep′id•ness, n.
in•trep′id•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.intrepid - invulnerable to fear or intimidationintrepid - invulnerable to fear or intimidation; "audacious explorers"; "fearless reporters and photographers"; "intrepid pioneers"
bold - fearless and daring; "bold settlers on some foreign shore"; "a bold speech"; "a bold adventure"

intrepid

intrepid

adjective
Translations
شُجاع، باسِل، جَسور
neohrožený
frygtløs
djarfur
bebaimiškumas
bezbailīgs

intrepid

[ɪnˈtrepɪd] ADJintrépido

intrepid

[ɪnˈtrɛpɪd] adjintrépide

intrepid

adj, intrepidly

intrepid

[ɪnˈtrɛpɪd] adjintrepido/a

intrepid

(inˈtrepid) adjective
bold and fearless. an intrepid explorer.
inˈtrepidly adverb
ˌintreˈpidity (-ˈpi-) noun
References in classic literature ?
Glimpses do ye seem to see of that mortally intolerable truth; that all deep, earnest thinking is but the intrepid effort of the soul to keep the open independence of her sea; while the wildest winds of heaven and earth conspire to cast her on the treacherous, slavish shore?
This intrepid discoverer proposes to traverse all Africa from east to west IN A BALLOON.
Some intrepid larches waved green pennons in the very midst of the turbulent water, here and there a veteran lay with his many-summered head abased in the rocky course of the stream, and here was a young foolhardy beech that had climbed within a dozen yards of the rampart.
With the intrepid woman who was his wife, and a few natives, he landed there, and set about building a house, and clearing the scrub so that he could plant cocoa-nuts.
At this moment the three intrepid travelers appeared.
Lady Bellaston was of this intrepid character; but let not my country readers conclude from her, that this is the general conduct of women of fashion, or that we mean to represent them as such.
The intrepid treasure-seeker walked round it, and, selecting the spot from whence it appeared most susceptible to attack, placed his lever in one of the crevices, and strained every nerve to move the mass.
He had originally been a petty eri, or chief; but, being of an intrepid and aspiring nature, he had risen in rank, and, availing himself of the superior advantages now afforded in navigation, had brought the whole archipelago in subjection to his arms.
But in a representative republic, where the executive magistracy is carefully limited; both in the extent and the duration of its power; and where the legislative power is exercised by an assembly, which is inspired, by a supposed influence over the people, with an intrepid confidence in its own strength; which is sufficiently numerous to feel all the passions which actuate a multitude, yet not so numerous as to be incapable of pursuing the objects of its passions, by means which reason prescribes; it is against the enterprising ambition of this department that the people ought to indulge all their jealousy and exhaust all their precautions.
From these intrepid wanderers how different our literary men who grow grey over their books behind a curtained window.
Mingott's bedroom) to picture her blameless life led in the stage-setting of adultery; but he said to himself, with considerable admiration, that if a lover had been what she wanted, the intrepid woman would have had him too.
The name of this intrepid adventurer was Michel Ardan.