intrinsicality


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Related to intrinsicality: Extrinsicality

intrinsicality

(ɪnˌtrɪnzɪˈkælɪtɪ) or

intrinsicalness

n
the quality of being intrinsic
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References in periodicals archive ?
Intrinsicality: Reconsidering spirituality, meaning(s) and mandates.
While intuitively and in line with the earlier discussion, the options, Messages, Measures and Moves do suggest greater and lesser degrees of intrinsicality of sustainability's influence in business decision making--this is only indicative and may not apply in a linear way in the minds of respondents nor in the minds of business managers.
The crucial features of the Appellate paradigm are: (1) "deference," meaning that reviewing courts will require heightened showings to declare error; (9) (2) "outcome orientation," meaning that a court reverses only when an error affected a proceeding's bottom line; (10) and (3) "intrinsicality," meaning that review is limited to the record in the prior proceeding.
ERICA SHUMENER, "Identity, Intrinsicality, and Laws of Nature." Adviser: Kit Fine.
(1) The Intrinsicality Thesis: powers are intrinsic properties whose instances do not depend on the existence of any other contingent objects.
(13.) Rorty, "Daniel Dennett on intrinsicality," in Truth and Progress, 104.
Bowman contends that the evolution of musical aesthetics has been entangled with the idea of musical value's "intrinsicality." Music psychology departs decisively from music philosophy in its markedly empirical proclivities.
intrinsicality of the despised and rejected among the common people
One way of doing so would be to take Richard Rorty's claim that it represents perhaps the final stage of the "Battle over Intrinsicality," grounded in whether you believe it possible or not "to defend the claim that there are intrinsic, non-relational features of objects," knowledge of which "is not the same as knowledge of how to use the words which one employs to describe those features" ("Holism" 186).
(2.) "Holism, Intrinsicality, Transcendence," in Bo Dahlbom, ed., Dennett and His Critics.
Painting with a broad brush, Holloway identifies Haydn as the purist, the most intellectual and self-conscious of composers, concerned more than any other with the music's "intrinsicality."