intrinsicate

intrinsicate

(ɪnˈtrɪnsɪˌkeɪt)
adj
intricate or involved
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
When Pound--and I would claim Roberts--strike the spacebar more than once between words, they "gesture something intrinsicate to [their] feeling of how the lines sound and of how meanings are built up" (Kenner 90).
She speaks to the silent, literally inanimate creature, angrily demanding its fatal bite, but also asking that it speak to Octavius, that it ventriloquize the contempt she feels for him: Come, thou mortal wretch, With thy sharp teeth this knot intrinsicate Of life at once untie.
(8.) Normand Berlin, borrowing and adapting Harry Levin's "apt phrase" to his pointed interpretative purposes, builds his reading of Hamlet & Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead on and around the intertwined themes of death and sex ("Death and sex in knot intrinsicate, prod the mystery, touch the secret cause," p.
From volute scroll to seamless rib, the pattern of the wood itself is intrinsicate with melody, suggestive of a promised plenitude: yet resonant, yet mute.
This point of view was very popular, and this is perhaps why, in the last scene of Shakespeare's play, Cleopatra says to the asp: "With thy sharp teeth this knot intrinsicate of life at once untie: poor venomous fool, be angry and dispatch...."
Applying the serpent to her breast, she commands, "With thy sharp teeth the knot intrinsicate / Of life at once untie" (V.