invasion

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in·va·sion

 (ĭn-vā′zhən)
n.
1. The act of invading, especially the entrance of an armed force into a territory to conquer.
2. The entry into bodily tissue and subsequent proliferation of an injurious entity, such as a pathogen or tumor.
3. An intrusion or encroachment: Your reading her diary was an invasion of her privacy.

[Middle English invasioun, from Old French invasion, from Late Latin invāsiō, invāsiōn-, from invāsus, past participle of invādere, to invade; see invade.]

invasion

(ɪnˈveɪʒən)
n
1. (Military) the act of invading with armed forces
2. any encroachment or intrusion: an invasion of rats.
3. the onset or advent of something harmful, esp of a disease
4. (Pathology) pathol the spread of cancer from its point of origin into surrounding tissues
5. (Botany) the movement of plants to a new area or to an area to which they are not native

in•va•sion

(ɪnˈveɪ ʒən)

n.
1. an act or instance of invading, esp. by an army.
2. the entrance or advent of anything troublesome or harmful, as disease.
3. entrance as if to take possession or overrun: the annual invasion of tourists.
4. infringement by intrusion: invasion of privacy.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin invāsiō < Latin invād(ere) to invade]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.invasion - the act of invadinginvasion - the act of invading; the act of an army that invades for conquest or plunder
penetration, incursion - an attack that penetrates into enemy territory
inroad - an invasion or hostile attack
2.invasion - any entry into an area not previously occupiedinvasion - any entry into an area not previously occupied; "an invasion of tourists"; "an invasion of locusts"
entering, entrance - a movement into or inward
3.invasion - (pathology) the spread of pathogenic microorganisms or malignant cells to new sites in the body; "the tumor's invasion of surrounding structures"
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
spread, spreading - process or result of distributing or extending over a wide expanse of space

invasion

noun
2. flood, flow, rush, arrival, influx, convergence, inflow, incursion, inundation, inrush Seaside resorts are preparing for an invasion of tourists.
3. intrusion, breach, violation, disturbance, disruption, infringement, overstepping, infiltration, encroachment, infraction, usurpation Is reading a child's diary a gross invasion of privacy?

invasion

noun
An act of invading, especially by military forces:
Translations
غَزْو
invaze
angrebinvasion
benyomulásinvázió
innrás
invázia
napadvdor
istilâ

invasion

[ɪnˈveɪʒən] Ninvasión f
invasion forcefuerza f invasora
it would be an invasion of privacy tosería una invasión de la intimidad ...

invasion

[ɪnˈveɪʒən] n
(by enemy) [country] → invasion f; [house, town] → invasion f
an invasion of flies → une invasion de mouches
a tourist invasion → une invasion de touristes
(= intrusion) an invasion of privacy → une atteinte à la vie privée
Is reading a child's diary always an invasion of privacy? → Lire le journal d'un enfant constitue-t-il toujours une atteinte à la vie privée?

invasion

n (lit, fig)Invasion f; (of privacy etc)Eingriff m (→ of in +acc); the Viking invasionder Einfall der Wikinger; the German invasion of Polandder Einmarsch or Einfall der Deutschen in Polen

invasion

[ɪnˈveɪʒn] ninvasione f
an invasion of sb's privacy → una violazione della privacy di qn

invade

(inˈveid) verb
(of an enemy) to enter (a country etc) with an army. Britain was twice invaded by the Romans.
inˈvader noun
a person, or (sometimes in singular with the) an armed force etc, that invades. Our armies fought bravely against the invader(s).
inˈvasion (-ʒən) noun

in·va·sion

n. invasión, acto de invadir.
References in classic literature ?
There is a wide difference, also, between military establishments in a country seldom exposed by its situation to internal invasions, and in one which is often subject to them, and always apprehensive of them.
He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people.
To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrections and repel Invasions;
A state like this would ever be exposed to the invasions of those who were powerful and inclined to attack it; but, as has been already mentioned, its situation preserves it, as it is free from the inroads of foreigners; and for this reason the family slaves still remain quiet at Crete, while the Helots are perpetually revolting: for the Cretans take no part in foreign affairs, and it is but lately that any foreign troops have made an attack upon the island; and their ravages soon proved the ineffectualness of their laws.
The husband was a conciliatory soul, with a great fund of resignation, which he expended on "Roger's friends." I suspect he was secretly horrified at these invasions. But it was a Carlist salon, and as such we were made welcome.
At any rate, whether we expect another invasion or not, our views of the human future must be greatly modified by these events.
She welcomed invasion. In her capacious maw was room for all the hosts of earth that could be hurled at her.
For," said he, "as flourishing a condition as we may appear to be in to foreigners, we labour under two mighty evils: a violent faction at home, and the danger of an invasion, by a most potent enemy, from abroad.
It might even win battles, and yet your standing army are mercenaries, and no great nation, from the days of Babylon, has resisted invasion or held an empire by her mercenaries."
And as upon the invasion of their valleys, the frosty Swiss have retreated to their mountains; so, hunted from the savannas and glades of the middle seas, the whale-bone whales can at last resort to their Polar citadels, and diving under the ultimate glassy barriers and walls there, come up among icy fields and floes; and in a charmed circle of everlasting December, bid defiance to all pursuit from man.
Suppose an invasion; would those three governments (if they agreed at all) be able, with all their respective forces, to operate against the enemy so effectually as the single government of Great Britain would?
For if it had been defended by proper valour, as are Germany, Spain, and France, either this invasion would not have made the great changes it has made or it would not have come at all.

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