invasive

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in·va·sive

 (ĭn-vā′sĭv)
adj.
1. Of, engaging in, or given to armed aggression: an invasive military force.
2.
a. Of or relating to a disease or condition that has a tendency to spread, especially into healthy tissue: an invasive carcinoma.
b. Of or relating to a medical procedure in which a part of the body is entered, as by puncture or incision.
3. Tending to spread widely in a habitat or ecosystem. Used especially of nonnative species: an invasive grass.
4. Tending to intrude or encroach, as upon privacy.
n.
An invasive species or organism.

[Middle English, from Old French invasif, from Medieval Latin invāsīvus, from Latin invāsus, past participle of invādere, to invade; see invade.]

in·va′sive·ly adv.
in·va′sive·ness n.

invasive

(ɪnˈveɪsɪv)
adj
1. of or relating to an invasion, intrusion, etc
2. (Pathology) relating to or denoting cancer at the stage at which it has spread from its site of origin to other tissues
3. (Surgery) (of surgery) involving making a relatively large incision in the body to gain access to the target of the surgery, as opposed to making a small incision or gaining access endoscopically through a natural orifice

in•va•sive

(ɪnˈveɪ sɪv)

adj.
1. characterized by or involving invasion; offensive.
2. invading, or tending to invade; intrusive.
3. requiring the entry of a needle, catheter, or other medical instrument into a part of the body.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.invasive - relating to a technique in which the body is entered by puncture or incision
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
noninvasive - relating to a technique that does not involve puncturing the skin or entering a body cavity
2.invasive - marked by a tendency to spread especially into healthy tissue; "invasive cancer cells"
confined - not invading healthy tissue
3.invasive - involving invasion or aggressive attack; "invasive war"
offensive - for the purpose of attack rather than defense; "offensive weapons"
4.invasive - gradually intrusive without right or permissioninvasive - gradually intrusive without right or permission; "we moved back from the encroaching tide"; "invasive tourists"; "trespassing hunters"
intrusive - tending to intrude (especially upon privacy); "she felt her presence there was intrusive"
Translations

invasive

[ɪnˈveɪsɪv] ADJ [surgery, cancer] → invasivo

invasive

adj
(Med) → invasiv
(Mil) → Invasions-; invasive warInvasionskrieg m

in·va·sive

a. invasor-a, invasivo-a; que invade tejidos adyacentes;
non- ___no ___.

invasive

adj invasivo, invasor; minimally — mínimamente invasivo
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the repair can be done minimally invasively, there is less pain, less bleeding and a short recovery period.
"There is a long lag phase between the onset and diagnosis of the disease, mainly due to its non-specific symptoms and because it can only be diagnosed invasively by laparoscopy.
Navident is a tool that uses volumetric medical images (CBCT) and real-time movement tracking to help dentists place implants more precisely, less invasively and more efficiently.
The acquisition will allow the company to further enhance the capability of its ExcelsiusGPS navigation and robotic system to assist surgeons in planning complex spine procedures and placing screws more accurately and less invasively.
This strong stance was also highlighted in the decision of the International Security Council today to invasively
We have found that the reference slow or respiratory waves might be extracted after demodulation of the non-invasively (or invasively) measured ICP pulse waves and used instead of the reference ABP waves [19], [20].
For Jeff Martin, Shoulder Options' Vice President of Commercial Operations, “Incorporating the unique GTFx plate into our commercialized AFT proximal humeral fracture system will allow surgeons to more effectively and less invasively treat a greater variety of proximal humeral fractures without the need of many different systems.”
A Repairing a chip can be carried out successfully, non invasively and very aesthetically.
It has no value when used gratuitously frequently and invasively without meaning.
For surgeons of my generation, the ability to access the abdominal cavity minimally invasively and to clearly visualize the contents was a significant step forward.