invective


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in·vec·tive

 (ĭn-vĕk′tĭv)
n.
1. Denunciatory or abusive language; vituperation: an orator known for his abundant use of invective.
2. A denunciatory or abusive expression or discourse: shouted invectives at the umpire.

[From Middle English invectif, denunciatory, from Old French, from Late Latin invectīvus, reproachful, abusive, from Latin invectus, past participle of invehī, to inveigh against; see inveigh.]

in·vec′tive adj.
in·vec′tive·ly adv.
in·vec′tive·ness n.

invective

(ɪnˈvɛktɪv)
n
vehement accusation or denunciation, esp of a bitterly abusive or sarcastic kind
adj
characterized by or using abusive language, bitter sarcasm, etc
[C15: from Late Latin invectīvus reproachful, scolding, from Latin invectus carried in; see inveigh]
inˈvectively adv
inˈvectiveness n

in•vec•tive

(ɪnˈvɛk tɪv)

n.
1. vehement denunciation, censure, or reproach; vituperation.
2. an insulting or abusive word or expression.
adj.
3. vituperative; denunciatory; censoriously abusive.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin invectīvus abusive, derivative of Latin invectus, past participle of invehī inveigh]
in•vec′tive•ly, adv.
in•vec′tive•ness, n.
syn: See abuse.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.invective - abusive or venomous language used to express blame or censure or bitter deep-seated ill willinvective - abusive or venomous language used to express blame or censure or bitter deep-seated ill will
contumely, insult, revilement, vilification, abuse - a rude expression intended to offend or hurt; "when a student made a stupid mistake he spared them no abuse"; "they yelled insults at the visiting team"

invective

noun abuse, censure, tirade, reproach, berating, denunciation, diatribe, vilification, tongue-lashing, billingsgate, vituperation, castigation, obloquy, contumely, philippic(s), revilement A woman had hurled racist invective at the family.

invective

nounadjective
Of, relating to, or characterized by verbal abuse:
Translations

invective

[ɪnˈvektɪv] N (= accusation) → invectiva f; (= abuse) → improperios mpl, palabras fpl fuertes

invective

[ɪnˈvɛktɪv] ninvective f

invective

nBeschimpfungen pl (→ against +gen), → Schmähungen pl (geh)(against gegen), Invektiven pl (liter)

invective

[ɪnˈvɛktɪv] ninvettiva
a stream of invective → una sfilza d'ingiurie, una sequela di improperi
References in classic literature ?
Mrs Deborah approved all these sentiments, and the dialogue concluded with a general and bitter invective against beauty, and with many compassionate considerations for all honest plain girls who are deluded by the wicked arts of deceitful men.
Strickland employed not the rapier of sarcasm but the bludgeon of invective.
Polyglot, of unknown parentage, of indefinite nationality, anarchist, with a pedantic and ferocious temperament, and an amazingly inflammatory capacity for invective, he was a power in the background, this violent pamphleteer clamouring for revolutionary justice, this Julius Laspara, editor of the
to prevent it from becoming merely a forum for invective.
What was meant by the invective against him who had no music in his soul?
He had the choler of the obese, easily roused and as easily calmed, and his boys soon discovered that there was much kindliness beneath the invective with which he constantly assailed them.
So they stood there facing one another, making all sorts of hideous noises the while they hurled jungle invective back and forth.
I checked the half-uttered invective, and scornfully turned away, regretting that I had given him so much amusement.
I now related my history briefly but with firmness and precision, marking the dates with accuracy and never deviating into invective or exclamation.
The lawyer stopped short in his invective, and listening for a moment, and recognising the well-known voice, rested his head upon his hand, raised his eyes to the ceiling, and muttered faintly,
The boy, patterning his conduct after that of his preceptor, unstoppered the vials of his invective upon the head of the enemy, until in realization of the futility of words as weapons he bethought himself of something heavier to hurl.
And lo, there spurted into his face all at once a cry of pain, and two curses and twenty bad invectives, so that in his fright he raised his stick and also struck the trodden one.