inveiglement


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in·vei·gle

 (ĭn-vā′gəl, -vē′-)
tr.v. in·vei·gled, in·vei·gling, in·vei·gles
1. To win over by coaxing, flattery, or artful talk: He inveigled a friend into becoming his tennis partner.
2. To obtain by cajolery: inveigled a free pass to the museum.

[Middle English envegle, alteration of Old French aveugler, to blind, from aveugle, blind, from Vulgar Latin *aboculus : Latin ab-, away from; see ab-1 + Latin oculus, eye (probably translation of Gaulish exsops : exs-, from + ops, eye); see okw- in Indo-European roots.]

in·vei′gle·ment n.
in·vei′gler n.
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inveiglement

noun
Something that attracts, especially with the promise of pleasure or reward:
References in classic literature ?
Bar could not at once return to his inveiglements of the most enlightened and remarkable jury he had ever seen in that box, with whom, he could tell his learned friend, no shallow sophistry would go down, and no unhappily abused professional tact and skill prevail (this was the way he meant to begin with them); so he said he would go too, and would loiter to and fro near the house while his friend was inside.
But just as playing up these possibilities is part of A's strategy of rhetorical inveiglement, so it is the voice that is Johannes's primary instrument of seduction, and which recurs again and again in the first half of Either/Or as the bridge by means of which the inner is intimated, albeit not straightforwardly, into outer presence.
(107) The Eleventh Circuit rejected this challenge, but it held that "[t]o determine whether a kidnapping by inveiglement has occurred prior to transportation, a fact finder must ascertain whether the alleged kidnapper had the willingness and intent to use physical or psychological force to complete the kidnapping in the event that his deception failed." (108)
Therefore among the general objectives of the awareness campaign, one can include: the differentiated apprise of target groups (depending on their capacity of receiving the information and of understanding its meaning) and the inveiglement of support groups when sending the messages, the press being a core group.