inventor


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in·vent

 (ĭn-vĕnt′)
tr.v. in·vent·ed, in·vent·ing, in·vents
1. To produce or contrive (something previously unknown) by the use of ingenuity or imagination.
2. To make up; fabricate: invent a likely excuse.

[Latin invenīre, invent-, to find : in-, on, upon; see in-2 + venīre, to come; see gwā- in Indo-European roots.]

in·vent′i·ble adj.
in·ven′tor n.

inventor

(ɪnˈvɛntə)
n
a person who invents, esp as a profession
inˈventress fem n

in•ven•tor

(ɪnˈvɛn tər)

n.
a person who invents, esp. one who devises some new process, appliance, machine, or article; one who makes inventions.
Sometimes, in•vent′er.
[1500–10; < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inventor - someone who is the first to think of or make somethinginventor - someone who is the first to think of or make something
creator - a person who grows or makes or invents things
patentee - the inventor to whom a patent is issued

inventor

noun creator, father, maker, author, framer, designer, architect, coiner, originator the inventor of the telephone

inventor

noun
One that creates, founds, or originates:
Translations
مُخْتَرِعمُخْتَرِعٌ
vynálezce
opfinder
keksijä
izumitelj
feltaláló
uppfinningamaîur
発明者
발명가
vynálezca
izumitelj
uppfinnare
ผู้ประดิษฐ์
muciticat eden kimse
người phát minh

inventor

[ɪnˈventəʳ] Ninventor(a) m/f

inventor

[ɪnˈvɛntər] ninventeur/trice m/f

inventor

nErfinder(in) m(f)

inventor

[ɪnˈvɛntəʳ] ninventore/trice

invent

(inˈvent) verb
1. to be the first person to make or use (eg a machine, method etc). Who invented the microscope?; When was printing invented?
2. to make up or think of (eg an excuse or story). I'll have to invent some excuse for not going with him.
inˈvention (-ʃən) noun
1. the act of inventing or the ability to invent. He had great powers of invention.
2. something invented. What a marvellous invention the sewing-machine was!
inˈventive (-tiv) adjective
good at inventing. an inventive mind.
inˈventiveness noun
inˈventor noun
a person who invents. Alexander Graham Bell was the inventor of the telephone.
see also discover.

inventor

مُخْتَرِعٌ vynálezce opfinder Erfinder εφευρέτης inventor keksijä inventeur izumitelj inventore 発明者 발명가 uitvinder oppfinner wynalazca inventor изобретатель uppfinnare ผู้ประดิษฐ์ mucit người phát minh 发明者
References in classic literature ?
AN Inventor went to a King and was granted an audience, when the following conversation ensued:
But the young inventor was too busy listening to the unseen speaker to answer his chum, even if he heard what Ned remarked, which is doubtful.
Swift, as has been said, was an inventor, as was his father.
I mean here the inventor of that most exquisite entertainment, called the English Pantomime.
And the third of these speech-improving Bells, the inventor of the telephone, inherited the peculiar genius of his fathers, both inventive and rhetorical, to such a degree that as a boy he had constructed an artificial skull, from gutta-percha and India rubber, which, when enlivened by a blast of air from a hand-bellows, would actually pronounce several words in an almost human manner.
Inaudible, but convincing, the great inventor expounded his discovery, and sent his obedient little model of the trains of the future up gradients, round curves, and across a sagging wire.
Homer, for example, makes men better than they are; Cleophon as they are; Hegemon the Thasian, the inventor of parodies, and Nicochares, the author of the Deiliad, worse than they are.
The inventor of a new cannon associated himself with the caster and the borer.
Here was a case where simplicity would have been an advantage; therefore, for no other reason, the inventor of this language complicated it all he could.
He called it the Sleet's crow's-nest, in honor of himself; he being the original inventor and patentee, and free from all ridiculous false delicacy, and holding that if we call our own children after our own names (we fathers being the original inventors and patentees), so likewise should we denominate after ourselves any other apparatus we may beget.
The learned vigils and labours of a certain class of inventors should have been rewarded with honourable liberality as justice demanded; and the bodies of the inventors should have been blown to pieces by means of their own perfected explosives and improved weapons with extreme publicity as the commonest prudence dictated.
Not around the inventors of new noise, but around the inventors of new values, doth the world revolve; INAUDIBLY it revolveth.