invertedly

invertedly

(ɪnˈvɜːtɪdlɪ)
adv
in a reversed or upside down manner
References in classic literature ?
However curious it may seem for an oil-ship to be borrowing oil on the whale-ground, and however much it may invertedly contradict the old proverb about carrying coals to Newcastle, yet sometimes such a thing really happens; and in the present case Captain Derick De Deer did indubitably conduct a lamp-feeder as Flask did declare.
195-203) whose "gentle rhythmic steps" will sustain quotation no better than did the rhyme-locked droning of "The Snow-Waste" (which the later passage oddly, invertedly resembles).
Nor will he miss the natural aptitude that has crept in among today's observers for sneering or looking down their invertedly snobbish noses at every part of British racing.
Can we say that her psychodrama indeed repetitively and invertedly stages the forceful imposition of the sexual frame (and desire allegedly issuing from it) that was far from natural?
Festive elements thus frequently function invertedly in dark literature, situating precisely the un-festive, or treacherously deceptive festive.
That didn't bother us too much, since, in an invertedly snobbish kind of way, neither of us cares for this revered delicacy.