inveterate

(redirected from inveteracies)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical.

inveterate

firmly established by long continuance, as a disease; chronic; settled or confirmed in a habit, practice, or feeling: He’s an inveterate runner.
Not to be confused with:
invertebrate – without a backbone; without strength of character: She’s an invertebrate who will lie about anything to stay out of trouble.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

in·vet·er·ate

 (ĭn-vĕt′ər-ĭt)
adj.
1. Firmly and long established; deep-rooted: inveterate preferences.
2. Persisting in an ingrained habit; habitual: an inveterate liar. See Synonyms at chronic.

[Middle English, from Latin inveterātus, past participle of inveterārī, to grow old, endure : in-, causative pref.; see in-2 + vetus, veter-, old; see wet- in Indo-European roots.]

in·vet′er·a·cy (-ər-ə-sē), in·vet′er·ate·ness n.
in·vet′er·ate·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

inveterate

(ɪnˈvɛtərɪt)
adj
1. long established, esp so as to be deep-rooted or ingrained: an inveterate feeling of hostility.
2. (prenominal) settled or confirmed in a habit or practice, esp a bad one; hardened: an inveterate smoker.
3. obsolete full of hatred; hostile
[C16: from Latin inveterātus of long standing, from inveterāre to make old, from in-2 + vetus old]
inˈveteracy, inˈveterateness n
inˈveterately adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•vet•er•ate

(ɪnˈvɛt ər ɪt)

adj.
1. confirmed in a habit, feeling, or the like: an inveterate gambler.
2. firmly established by long continuance, as a disease; chronic.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin inveterātus, orig. past participle of inveterāre to grow old, allow to grow old, preserve =in- in-2 + veterāre, v. derivative of vetus, s. veter- old; compare veteran]
in•vet′er•a•cy (-ə si) n.
in•vet′er•ate•ly, adv.
in•vet′er•ate•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inveterate - habitual; "a chronic smoker"
usual - occurring or encountered or experienced or observed frequently or in accordance with regular practice or procedure; "grew the usual vegetables"; "the usual summer heat"; "came at the usual time"; "the child's usual bedtime"
Adv.1.inveterate - in a habitual and longstanding manner; "smoking chronically"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

inveterate

adjective
2. deep-rooted, entrenched, ingrained, deep-seated, incurable, established the inveterate laziness of these boys
3. staunch, long-standing, dyed-in-the-wool, deep-dyed (usually derogatory) the spirit of an inveterate Tory
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

inveterate

adjective
2. Subject to a disease or habit for a long time:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
inveteradomaligno

inveterate

[ɪnˈvetərɪt] ADJ [gambler] → empedernido; [laziness, selfishness] → inveterado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

inveterate

[ɪnˈvɛtərət] adjinvétéré(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

inveterate

adj dislike, hatredtief verwurzelt, abgrundtief; lazinesschronisch; opposition, prejudice, habithartnäckig; enemiesunversöhnlich; liar, gamblerunverbesserlich; collector, travellerpassioniert; inveterate smoker/criminalGewohnheitsraucher(in) m(f)/-verbrecher(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

inveterate

[ɪnˈvɛtrɪt] adj (habit, gambler) → inveterato/a; (liar, smoker) → incallito/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
As the Orientals say, "A cur's tail may be warmed, and pressed, and bound round with ligatures, and after a twelve years' labor bestowed upon it, still it will retain its natural form." The only effectual cure for such inveteracies as these tails exhibit is to make glue of them, which I believe is what is usually done with them, and then they will stay put and stick.