invidious

(redirected from invidiousness)
Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to invidiousness: enviousness

invidious

unfairly discriminating; injurious; hateful; calculated to give offense; causing animosity or resentment: an invidious comment
Not to be confused with:
insidious – progressing inconspicuously but harmfully: an insidious disease; treacherous; crafty; stealthily deceitful: an insidious agreement; corrupting; cunning, wily
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

in·vid·i·ous

 (ĭn-vĭd′ē-əs)
adj.
1. Tending to rouse ill will, animosity, or resentment: invidious accusations.
2. Offensive and unfair: invidious distinctions.
3. Archaic Envious.

[Latin invidiōsus, envious, hostile, from invidia, envy; see envy.]

in·vid′i·ous·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

invidious

(ɪnˈvɪdɪəs)
adj
1. incurring or tending to arouse resentment, unpopularity, etc: an invidious task.
2. (of comparisons or distinctions) unfairly or offensively discriminating
3. obsolete grudging; envious
[C17: from Latin invidiōsus full of envy, from invidia envy]
inˈvidiously adv
inˈvidiousness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•vid•i•ous

(ɪnˈvɪd i əs)

adj.
1. calculated to create ill will; causing resentment or envy.
2. offensively or unfairly discriminating; injurious: invidious comparisons.
3. Obs. envious.
[1600–10; < Latin invidiōsus, derivative of invidi(a) envy]
in•vid′i•ous•ly, adv.
in•vid′i•ous•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.invidious - containing or implying a slight or showing prejudice; "discriminatory attitudes and practices"; "invidious comparisons"
unfavorable, unfavourable - not encouraging or approving or pleasing; "unfavorable conditions"; "an unfavorable comparison"; "unfavorable comments", "unfavorable impression"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

invidious

adjective
1. undesirable, unpleasant, hateful, thankless He's in the invidious position of having to break the bad news.
undesirable pleasant, desirable, pleasing
2. unfair, unjust, unjustified, inequitable It is invidious to make a selection.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

invidious

adjective
1. Damaging to the reputation:
Law: libelous.
2. Resentfully or painfully desirous of another's advantages:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

invidious

[ɪnˈvɪdɪəs] ADJ [job, task] → odioso, ingrato; [comparison] → injusto
I find myself in an invidious positionme encuentro en una situación ingrata
it would be invidious to mention namessería inapropiado mencionar nombres
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

invidious

[ɪnˈvɪdiəs] adj
[comparison] → indu(e)
We should guard against invidious comparisons with Scotland Yard → Nous devrions nous garder de toute comparaison indue avec Scotland Yard.
[task] → peu enviable
(= awkward) [position] → peu enviable
to be put in an invidious position → être placé dans une position peu enviable
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

invidious

adj remarkgehässig, boshaft; task, positionunerfreulich, unangenehm; behaviour, conductgemein; distinctions, comparison, discriminationungerecht; it would be invidious to …es wäre ungerecht, zu …
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

invidious

[ɪnˈvɪdɪəs] adj (comparison) → ingiusto/a; (task) → poco invidiabile, antipatico/a; (choice) → imbarazzante, difficile
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
interests affected and the invidiousness of the particular
(344) The risk of complicating our histories is that some may view such complications--and the ways they draw our present closer to our past--as reason to reassess the invidiousness of our past, rather than the perceived noninvidiousness of our present.
Federation of Pakistan' decided by Justice Shaukat Siddiqui of the Islamabad High Court, a decision which is unparalleled for the astonishing level of invidiousness it contains against a particular minority.
The invidiousness of the discrimination that exists when criminal procedures are made available only to those who can pay is not erased by any differences in the sentences that may be imposed.
Without defending the invidiousness of competition, one is tempted to question whether novelists merit St.
beyond intent or invidiousness. (72) But while Justice Brennan
The Court buttressed these normative claims of inherent invidiousness with related claims of "consistency" (i.e., claims that the Court must treat all racial classifications the same).
783, 797 (1973) ("'The fact that district boundaries may have been drawn in a way that minimizes the number of contests between present incumbents does not in and of itself establish invidiousness.'") (quoting Bums v.
Despite the ubiquitous critical belief in Jonson's personal invidiousness, Lynn Meskill rightly claims that there has been no thorough consideration of how envy functions within his writings.
(98) Intent is understood as crucial to this inquiry; equal protection violations arise only when the government has classified '"because of,' not merely 'in spite of,'" (99) a certain trait, whose inherent invidiousness or lack thereof determines the proper level of scrutiny.
"Individuals," they write, "who are concerned about the truths they read in Science magazine, or the Atlantic Monthly, the National Geographic, the NewYork Review of Books, or Books and Culture, are in this respect more virtuous than people who are interested in the truths they read in People magazine or the gossip columns, because the truths that are found there are mostly trivial or even salacious and invidious (that is, the truths aren't vicious, but it is less than virtuous to care about them, or to care much about them)." (16) The periodicals they have advocated are, however, open to the same criticism of triviality, invidiousness, and even, at times, salaciousness as the tabloids they pillory.