inwit

inwit

(ˈɪnˌwɪt)
n
the sense of right and wrong that governs a person's thoughts and actionsunderstanding or reason

inwit

- Usually means "an inner sense of right or wrong," but its more general meaning is "reason, intellect, understanding, or wisdom."
See also related terms for intellect.
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INWIT, the largest telecom tower company in Italy, and Huawei signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) for close cooperation in products and technologies, services and platforms, and ecosystems and expansions of indoor businesses.
2 Modelo de ingreso laboral A) Ecuacion: Inwit = p\nwit-i + faIndurit + facia + faa% + Vi H" Git In wu-1 0.
a:dlig 'sick', a:gi:tan 'waste', andsacian 'dispute', belae:wan 'betray', craeftig 'skilful', forrae:dan 'plot against', forwyrht 'misdeed', (ge)andettan 'confess', (ge)edcwician 'revive', (ge)fulwian 'baptize', (ge)ha:lgian 'hallow', (ge)wi:tegian 'prophesy', gifol 'liberal', inwit 2 'wicked', myrdrian 'murder', oferhogian 'despise', rx:swan 'think', uncu:d 'unknown', unhold 'disloyal', u: dwitian 'study philosophy', widersacian 'renounce'
The Ancient Mariner's story is just such a symbolic-diegetic complex; and he himself is a "Scriptural" order of personage, all "background," driven by an ineluctable past, by the agenbite of inwit.
It was here that poet Albert Goldbarth first felt the agenbite of inwit, the teeth of the green-eyed monster, for his pelvic sophomore, and had to be succored by the understanding group.
In the Kentish Ayenbite of Inwit (1340) Michael Northgate translated the word ire as "hatred.
Durh diofles facen [&] purh his inwit we wurdon on frymde beswicene, and for Adames gewyrhtum we waeron of dam eadilican setle neorxnawanges gefean utascofene [&] on laas wraec sende pysse worulde pe we nu on lyfiad.
His recollection of Shakespeare's line ('And let our crooked smokes') is followed by another 'revelation' of his relentless memory habit: a lightning flash of inwit just as quickly identified as yet another borrowing from an existing reserve:
The old agenbite of inwit stings and smarts, a hook in the gills even when line and rod are gone.
Literary types may recognize in this involuted little title an allusion to "agenbite of inwit," the anguished refrain eddying in the stream of Stephen Dedalus's consciousness in Joyce's Ulysses, archaic English for "remorse of conscience.
Many more examples appear later in Bevis of Hampton, Arthur and Merlin, Guy of Warwick (1), The Seven Sages (1), all from 1330, in Ayenbit of Inwit (1340) and the Midland Prose Psalter (1350).
That may be meant to suggest another problem entirely, Jake's agenbite of inwit, but it's less trivial than it seems, part of what Julius calls the aesthetics of ugliness.