irenicon

irenicon

(aɪˈriːnɪˌkɒn)
n
(Rhetoric) a variant spelling of eirenicon
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References in periodicals archive ?
I am not without hope that an irenicon could be found which would be acceptable to all parties on the vexed and vital questions which I have discussed in this article.
If you go to the discussion board feature of "CotW," you will see, in particular a little discussion of the word "irenicon." That is, something that brings harmony.
So here's my idea: an online irenicon. If the English language could unite and inspire vast swathes of humanity back then, then maybe now the English language, plus the Internet, could do the same in our time.
Vadim Alexeev of the Irenicon Peace Centre, based at the Orthodox PIMENS, or Inter-Church Partnership, has now organized a peace pilgrimage for the last four years in and around St Petersburg.
Auden gave him his voice, "the natural modern diction and the use of words that had never appeared in poetry: textbook words, newspaper words, the convoluted syntax, the mixture of economics and love, the brilliance and the gloom." Baltimore, especially Jewish Baltimore, was a center of Communist activity; Shapiro discovered Auden in a British magazine at a Communist bookstore and was inspired by the "long Auden historical-prophetic sweep" to write the most ambitious of his juvenile poems, a tortuous meditation on Marxism called "Irenicon," clotted with words like "trepid," "connate," and "guerdon." It is rough chewing, but at least Shapiro had taken a bite of the real city around him:
My book then is of the nature of an Irenicon on the