iron lung

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iron lung

n.
An airtight metal tank that encloses all of the body except the head and forces the lungs to inhale and exhale through regulated changes in air pressure.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

iron lung

n
1. (Medicine) an airtight metal cylinder enclosing the entire body up to the neck and providing artificial respiration when the respiratory muscles are paralysed, as by poliomyelitis
2. informal Irish a gas container used in dispensing beer
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

i′ron lung′


n.
a rigid respirator that encloses the whole body except the head and in which alternate pulsations of high and low pressure induce normal breathing movements or force air into and out of the lungs.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.iron lung - respirator that produces alternations in air pressure in a chamber surrounding a patient's chest to force air into and out of the lungs thus providing artificial respirationiron lung - respirator that produces alternations in air pressure in a chamber surrounding a patient's chest to force air into and out of the lungs thus providing artificial respiration
inhalator, respirator - a breathing device for administering long-term artificial respiration
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

iron lung

n (Med) → polmone m d'acciaio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

iron lung

n. pulmón de hierro, máquina que se usa para producir respiración artificial.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
We had our share of patients with Guillain-Barre in iron lungs. Care was next to impossible.
I remember iron lungs and life-threatening conditions that are mere inconveniences today.
Many years later, as a student nurse on pediatric rotation at DC Children's Hospital, the hospital where my friend Deidre was treated, I was shown the iron lungs, which were then being stored in the hospital basement.
At various stages in its history, the plant also built Tiger Moth aircraft, ambulances, parachutes and iron lungs.
We might have learned more about the nature of iron lungs, but The Sessions does feature an extraordinarily open performance from its A-list star.
Some of the more enduring memories associated with epidemic polio include woollen hot packs, admonitions from parents to avoid swimming pools, and iron lungs. These images and memories, though, are largely specific only to the last two epidemics.
This being our 30th year, we're taking a look back and applying what we know to the present in order to better prepare for the future--one that doesn't involve shotguns and iron lungs. (It does involve AdvisorOne.com, however, a new site where Investment Advisor content will now live--see Group Editor-in-Chief Jamie Green's introduction on page 134.)
patio slabs, the TV dinners and iron lungs, the heaps of magazines with
"We'll have people dine inside the iron lungs," Carl said.
Remixed by Francois Kevorkian, this percolating jam was huge in gay discos, where Moyet's throaty contralto left many revelers convinced it was a dude growling, "Now he's in control / He is my lover." The record has proven remarkably resilient, recharting via remixes by Youth and Club 69 in 1990 and 1999, respectively, and even withstanding the iron lungs of Tom Jones (who covered it on his 1994 debacle The Lead and How to Swing It).
I am not aware of any literature that describes aerosol delivery for patients in iron lungs and haven't taken the time to search, but I would not be surprised if it occurred.
The change from the use of iron lungs, which were expensive and cumbersome, to prolonged positive pressure ventilation through a cuffed endotracheal or tracheostomy tube was an essential factor in the development of critical care.